• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Seasonal road closures in effect

    Seasonal road closures are in effect for motorized vehicles. The Teton Park Road is closed from the Taggart Lake Trailhead to the Signal Mountain Lodge. The Moose-Wilson Road is closed from the Granite Canyon Trailhead to the Death Canyon Road. More »

  • Avalanche hazards exist in the park

    Avalanche hazards exist in the park, especially in mountain canyons and on exposed slopes. A daily avalanche forecast can be found at www.jhavalanche.org or by calling (307) 733-2664. More »

  • Bears emerging from hibernation

    Bears are beginning to emerge from hibernation. Travel in groups of three of more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay at least 100 yards from bears. More »

Wetlands, Marshes and Swamps

Oxbow Bend Fall Sunrise
Oxbow Bend Fall Sunrise
 
Nature and Science

Bull Moose in lily pond.




Wetlands, marshes, and swamps are abundant in Grand Teton National Park. These areas are fed by numerous mountain streams, springs, or seeps and provide vital habitat for a wide variety of plants and animals. Vegetation such as pond lilies, willows, and cattails supply wildlife with food and shelter.

It is very common to see wildlife browsing in these areas where the water meets the land. Oxbow Bend and Willow Flats provide excellent habitat for moose that graze on willow and other aquatic vegetation.

Beyond providing habitat for plants and animals, wetlands help filter water and temper flood waters. Whether they are created by a beaver's dam at Schwabacher's Landing or are naturally occuring along the Snake, wetlands are an integral component of the ecosystem.

Did You Know?

Banded gneiss

Did you know that the granite and gneiss composing the core of the Teton Range are some of the oldest rocks in North America, but the mountains are among the youngest in the world?