• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Seasonal road closures in effect

    Seasonal road closures are in effect for motorized vehicles. The Teton Park Road is closed from the Taggart Lake Trailhead to the Signal Mountain Lodge. The Moose-Wilson Road is closed from the Granite Canyon Trailhead to the Death Canyon Road. More »

  • Avalanche hazards exist in the park

    Avalanche hazards exist in the park, especially in mountain canyons and on exposed slopes. A daily avalanche forecast can be found at www.jhavalanche.org or by calling (307) 733-2664. More »

  • Bears emerging from hibernation

    Bears are beginning to emerge from hibernation. Travel in groups of three of more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay at least 100 yards from bears. More »

Flood Plains

Schwabachers Landing is one of many access areas to view the Snake River flood plain.
Schwabachers Landing is one of many access areas along the Snake River to view a flood plain ecosystem.
Erin Himmel/NPS Photo


River levels fluctuate throughout the year. The flood plain is the area around a river that experiences flooding while water levels are high. In the park you can see the Snake River meander through its flood plain, creating a braided effect.

Wetlands and marshes are found in the flood plain and provide vital plant and animal habitat. A great place to view wildlife in the flood plain is Schwabacher's Landing, where you can observe an active beaver colony.

Flooding brings nutrients to the flood plain because rivers carry rich sediments and material that serves as fertilizer. Efforts to control natural flooding in one area often leads to worse flooding in other areas. Wild rivers without levees or dams are becoming increasingly hard to find.

Did You Know?

Mt. Moran in July

Did you know that the black stripe, or dike, on the face of Mount Moran is 150 feet wide and extends six or seven miles westward? The black dike was once molten magma that squeezed into a crack when the rocks were deep underground, and has since been lifted skyward by movement on the Teton fault.