• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

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  • Bears are active in Grand Teton

    Black and grizzly bears are roaming throughout the park--near roads, trails and in backcountry areas. Hikers and backcountry users are advised to travel in groups of three or more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay 100 yards from bears. More »

Fish

Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout
Cutthroat Trout
 

Rivers, lakes and ponds sparkle on the landscape obscuring the processes and life forms that exist below. The most familiar creature of this underwater world is fish. Though they often go unnoticed, fish are crucial to the health of the regions ecosystem.

The fish species present in Grand Teton National Park vary widely in shape, size and behavior. The mountain sucker feeds on algae. The cutthroat trout, named for the red slash under the lower jaw, feeds mainly on insects and smaller fish. The Utah chub lives in warm, shallow, slow-moving water. The mountain whitefish prefers cold, deep, fast-moving water. Despite their many differences, all fish are the primary food source for several species of birds, mammals, and other fish. The bald eagles depend on fish for their survival. Many other animals, including humans, consume fish as a secondary food source. Fish in turn control plant and insect populations. The well-being of fish worldwide is threatened by pollution, loss of habitat and overfishing.

Grand Teton National Park has a worldwide reputation for its excellent trout fishing. Of the five species of trout present in the park, however, only the Snake River cutthroat trout is native. More than a dozen species of fish thrive in Grand Teton National Park.

Native Species

Snake River cutthroat trout
Utah sucker
Longnose dace
Redside shiner
Paiute sculpin
Mountain whitefish
Speckled dace
Mountain sucker
Mottled sculpin

Non-Native Species

Rainbow trout
Eastern brook trout
Lake trout
Brown trout
Utah chub
Arctic grayling
Bluehead sucker

Did You Know?

Mt. Moran in July

Did you know that the black stripe, or dike, on the face of Mount Moran is 150 feet wide and extends six or seven miles westward? The black dike was once molten magma that squeezed into a crack when the rocks were deep underground, and has since been lifted skyward by movement on the Teton fault.