• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

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  • Bears are active in Grand Teton

    Black and grizzly bears are roaming throughout the park--near roads, trails and in backcountry areas. Hikers and backcountry users are advised to travel in groups of three or more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay 100 yards from bears. More »

  • Moose-Wilson Road Closure

    The Moose-Wilson Road between Death Canyon Junction north to the intersection with the Murie Center Road is temporarily closed to motor vehicles, bicycles, skating, skateboards and similar devices. For current road conditions call 307-739-3682. More »

  • Multi-use Pathway Closures

    Intermittent closures of the park Multi-use Pathway System will occur through mid-October during asphalt sealing and safety improvement work. Pathway sections will reopen as work is completed. Follow the link for a map and more information. More »

Birds

Sandhill Crane

Sandhill Crane

Grand Teton National Park has many diverse communities that support a variety of birds. Some of the largest and smallest North American birds inhabit or pass through the park and parkway. The calliope hummingbird, the smallest North American bird, weighs less than a tenth of an ounce. This bird can be found around blooming scarlet gilia and near willow shrubs. The trumpeter swan, the largest waterfowl in North America, can be found at Oxbow Bend, Swan Lake and Flat Creek in the National Elk Refuge. Trumpeter swans are often found in pairs that mate for life.

Osprey and bald eagles hunt and nest near water. The sight of these birds catching a fish is a special treat. Ospreys carry fish in their talons so the fish is parallel to the bird's body in an efficient streamlined position. Osprey are often mistaken for bald eagles.

The Western Tanager is one of the most colorful birds in the Tetons frequenting the forests. The male is red, orange, yellow and black reflecting its winter range in the tropics. If you visit the park during spring, look for the courtship display of the sage grouse in the sagebrush community. During display, the male sage grouse tail feathers spread over a 280-degree angle and they expand air sacs on the chest that produce a popping sound to attract a female.

Birdwatchers are reminded to view birds from a distance especially while nesting, preferably with binoculars. As with all wildlife, birds are not to be harassed or disturbed.

Related Information
Bird Finding Guide

Bird Checklist (USGS website)

Did You Know?

Pika with a mouth full of grass

Did you know that pikas harvest grasses so they can survive the long cold winter? These small members of the rabbit family do not hibernate, but instead store their harvest as “haystacks” under rocks in the alpine environment.