• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Seasonal road closures in effect

    Seasonal road closures are in effect for motorized vehicles. The Teton Park Road is closed from the Taggart Lake Trailhead to the Signal Mountain Lodge. The Moose-Wilson Road is closed from the Granite Canyon Trailhead to the Death Canyon Road. More »

  • Avalanche hazards exist in the park

    Avalanche hazards exist in the park, especially in mountain canyons and on exposed slopes. A daily avalanche forecast can be found at www.jhavalanche.org or by calling (307) 733-2664. More »

  • Bears emerging from hibernation

    Bears are beginning to emerge from hibernation. Travel in groups of three of more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay at least 100 yards from bears. More »

Jackson Hole Wildlife Park

Watching elk
Visitors watching elk in the Jackson Hole Wildlife Park.
 

Laurance S. Rockefeller’s Jackson Hole Preserve cooperated with the New York Zoological Society and Wyoming Game and Fish Commission to establish a wildlife park in 1948, attracting visitors to the Jackson Hole National Monument (now Grand Teton National Park). The wildlife park served as a scientific research center and a place where visitors could view bison and elk.

When homesteaders first arrived in 1884, no bison roamed the Jackson Hole valley. The wildlife park reintroduced a small captive herd of bison to the valley. In 1968, 15 bison broke through the wildlife park’s fences, starting Jackson’s free-roaming herd. Jackson Hole resident and renowned biologist, Olaus Murie objected to the staged viewing, calling the fenced park the “antithesis” of healthy wildlife habitat. The National Park Service later abandoned the unnatural and controversial display.

Today, our only reminder of the wildlife park is the free-roaming herd of bison found throughout the park.

How to get there: Although nothing remains of the wildlife park you can see the area where it was located by driving on highway 89 west toward Jackson Lake Junction. Park at the large unmarked turnout just east of the Oxbow Bend Turnout. Elk and bison once grazed behind a fence in the open meadow to your southwest.

Did You Know?

Pika with a mouth full of grass

Did you know that pikas harvest grasses so they can survive the long cold winter? These small members of the rabbit family do not hibernate, but instead store their harvest as “haystacks” under rocks in the alpine environment.