• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

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  • Bears are active in Grand Teton

    Black and grizzly bears are roaming throughout the park--near roads, trails and in backcountry areas. Hikers and backcountry users are advised to travel in groups of three or more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay 100 yards from bears. More »

  • Area closure in effect for trails in the Jenny Lake Area

    A temporary area closure will be in effect for several trails in the Jenny Lake area due to construction activities involving helicopter-assisted transport of heavy material. The closure will last from October 27 through October 30, and possibly longer. More »

  • Multi-use Pathway Closures

    Intermittent closures of the park Multi-use Pathway System will occur through mid-October during asphalt sealing and safety improvement work. Pathway sections will reopen as work is completed. Follow the link for a map and more information. More »

  • Moose-Wilson Road Status

    The Moose-Wilson Road between the Death Canyon Road and the Murie Center Road is currently open to all traffic. The road may re-close at any time due to wildlife activity. For current road conditions call 307-739-3682. More »

Jackson Hole Wildlife Park

Watching elk
Visitors watching elk in the Jackson Hole Wildlife Park.
 

Laurance S. Rockefeller’s Jackson Hole Preserve cooperated with the New York Zoological Society and Wyoming Game and Fish Commission to establish a wildlife park in 1948, attracting visitors to the Jackson Hole National Monument (now Grand Teton National Park). The wildlife park served as a scientific research center and a place where visitors could view bison and elk.

When homesteaders first arrived in 1884, no bison roamed the Jackson Hole valley. The wildlife park reintroduced a small captive herd of bison to the valley. In 1968, 15 bison broke through the wildlife park’s fences, starting Jackson’s free-roaming herd. Jackson Hole resident and renowned biologist, Olaus Murie objected to the staged viewing, calling the fenced park the “antithesis” of healthy wildlife habitat. The National Park Service later abandoned the unnatural and controversial display.

Today, our only reminder of the wildlife park is the free-roaming herd of bison found throughout the park.

How to get there: Although nothing remains of the wildlife park you can see the area where it was located by driving on highway 89 west toward Jackson Lake Junction. Park at the large unmarked turnout just east of the Oxbow Bend Turnout. Elk and bison once grazed behind a fence in the open meadow to your southwest.

Did You Know?

Close-up of trumpeter swan head

Did you know that Grand Teton National Park is home to the largest bird in North America? The Trumpeter Swan weighs 20-30 pounds and lives in the valley year-round in quiet open water.