• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Seasonal road closures in effect

    Seasonal road closures are in effect for motorized vehicles. The Teton Park Road is closed from the Taggart Lake Trailhead to the Signal Mountain Lodge. The Moose-Wilson Road is closed from the Granite Canyon Trailhead to the Death Canyon Road. More »

  • Avalanche hazards exist in the park

    Avalanche hazards exist in the park, especially in mountain canyons and on exposed slopes. A daily avalanche forecast can be found at www.jhavalanche.org or by calling (307) 733-2664. More »

  • Bears emerging from hibernation

    Bears are beginning to emerge from hibernation. Travel in groups of three of more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay at least 100 yards from bears. More »

Jenny Lake Lodge

Jenny Lake Lodge Sunday Brunch, 1948
Jenny Lake Lodge, Sunday Brunch, 1948
 

In 2010, the Jenny Lake Lodge was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

Today as in the past, the Jenny Lake Lodge serves as an elegant, rustic resort reflecting the rugged majesty of the surrounding landscape. During the 1920s and 30s, Eastern “dudes” sought Western ranches with the comforts of home. Tony Grace capitalized on this demand by establishing a homestead with two rental cabins on the northeast side of Jenny Lake in 1922. The Snake River Land Company bought the ranch in 1930. In 1935 catastrophe struck and much of the main lodge burned. By 1939 after reconstruction, the lodge boasted comfortable accommodations for 65 dudes including fine food and private baths with hot and cold running water.

How to get there: Drive north from Jackson to Moose Junction. Turn left onto the Teton Park Road toward Moose. Drive through the entrance station eleven miles, turn left at North Jenny Lake Junction. Follow the scenic drive 1.5 miles and bend left onto the one-way portion of the road. The lodge will be on your left.

Did You Know?

Pronghorn

Did you know that pronghorns are the fastest mammals in the western hemisphere? They can run up to 70 mph, but do not like to jump fences! In the summer, pronghorn live along Antelope Flats Road, but in fall they migrate almost 200 miles to central Wyoming.