• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

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  • Bears are active in Grand Teton

    Black and grizzly bears are roaming throughout the park--near roads, trails and in backcountry areas. Hikers and backcountry users are advised to travel in groups of three or more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay 100 yards from bears. More »

  • Area closure in the area around Baxter's Pinnacle

    An area closure is in effect around Baxter's Pinnacle to protect nesting peregrine falcons. This closure precludes any climbs of Baxter's Pinnacle and usage of the walk-off gully. This closure will be in effect through 8-15-2013. More »

Elbo Ranch

Rodeo Elbo Ranch
Rodeo at the Elbo Ranch with the Grand Teton towering above.
Jackson Hole Historical Society and Museum, #1958.2223.001
 
Elbo Ranch Gate

Ranch Gate for the Elbo Ranch, 1947.

James “Jimmy” Manges sold 115 acres of his homestead to Chester Goss and his partners who established the Elbo Ranch in 1926. Their “cabin camp” boasted tourist cabins with indoor plumbing, a store, a baseball diamond, a large rodeo arena with a racetrack, a grandstand and refreshment kiosks. A roadside billboard proclaimed, “the home of the Hollywood Cowboy.” Acclaimed writer and owner of the Bar BC Dude Ranch, Struthers Burt, wrote Yellowstone Superintendent Horace Albright: “This speedway down here, the El-Bo Ranch and the south end of Timber Island, not to mention Jenny’s Lake, has about sickened me with this neck of the woods.” The Snake River Land Company bought the Elbo Ranch in 1929 setting aside this land for future park expansion. The ranch no longer exists, but faint remnants of the racetrack may be seen from above.

How to get there: Park at the southern entrance to the River Road, located just north of the Cottonwood Creek picnic area. The open sage just north of this parking area held the racetrack. Other Elbo Ranch structures stood on the west side of the road, north of the Jimmy Manges cabin.

Did You Know?

Tetons from the north, photo by Erin Himmel

Did you know that a large fault lies at the base of the Teton Range? Every few thousand years earthquakes up to a magnitude of 7.5 on the Richter Scale signal movement on the Teton fault, lifting the mountains skyward and hinging the valley floor downward.