• The Cathedral Group from the Teton Park Road

    Grand Teton

    National Park Wyoming

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  • Bears are active in Grand Teton

    Black and grizzly bears are roaming throughout the park--near roads, trails and in backcountry areas. Hikers and backcountry users are advised to travel in groups of three or more, make noise and carry bear spray. Visitors must stay 100 yards from bears. More »

  • Area closure in the area around Baxter's Pinnacle

    An area closure is in effect around Baxter's Pinnacle to protect nesting peregrine falcons. This closure precludes any climbs of Baxter's Pinnacle and usage of the walk-off gully. This closure will be in effect through 8-15-2013. More »

Curriculum Materials

Bring Grand Teton National Park to your classroom!
Grand Teton offers a variety of materials for educators to bring relevant lessons from the field into the classroom. These materials may be used to develop stand-alone lessons, in preparation for a field trip, or to reinforce the experiences had on a field trip.

Browse Our Curriculum Materials

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  • Yellowstone National Park

    Painting 1000 Words

    Painting 1000 Words

    Students examine historic Yellowstone artwork and discover the influential “voices” of painter Thomas Moran and photographer William H. Jackson. Students then give voice to their own Yellowstone experiences through watercolors and photographs.

  • Yellowstone National Park

    Landscaping with Wind and Water

    Landscaping with Wind and Water

    Students demonstrate the destructive forces of erosion on small “mountains” and survey an area in the park, such as Lamar Valley, to identify evidences of erosion. Students interview a petrified tree in its natural setting to learn more about the changing landscape of Yellowstone.

  • Yellowstone National Park

    Invent an Animal

    Invent an Animal

    Students work collaboratively to create fictitious animals in order to understand adaptations that help wildlife survive among various habitats throughout the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.

  • Yellowstone National Park

    A Bear’s Menu

    A Bear’s Menu

    Working in small groups, students examine the feeding habits of bears and draw pictures to show what bears do in spring, summer, fall, and winter. Students use a small pattern of a grizzly bear and increase its scale to construct a full-size silhouette in order to appreciate the bear’s size.

  • Grand Teton National Park

    Dress for Winter

    Dress for Winter

    Students will dress for winter while explaining the purpose and function behind each layer. Throughout the lesson, students will learn and incorporate vocabulary terms related to heat transfer. At the completion of the lesson, students will be able to explain the different clothing layers and make reasonable choices for dressing in winter conditions.

  • Grand Teton National Park

    What is Wild?

    What is Wild?

    Students will learn about and discuss why we have National Parks set aside to be ‘wild’. They will compare National Parks to their local surroundings in town or at school.

  • Marsh - Billings - Rockefeller National Historical Park

    Nature, Art and Conservation at Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park

    Nature, Art and Conservation at Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park

    Thomas Cole, the founder of the Hudson River School, stated “The ravages of the axe are daily increasing desecration by what is called improvement; which as yet generally destroys Nature’s beauty without substituting that of Art.” This unit, Nature, Art and Conservation at Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historic Park, will explore this very issue through on-site visits, school based lessons and independent research. For this unit students will begin by reading Marsh’s Man and Nature...

Did You Know?

Beaver Dick Leigh and his family.

Did you know that Jenny and Leigh Lakes are named for the fur trapper “Beaver” Dick Leigh and his wife Jenny (not pictured)? Beaver Dick and Jenny assisted the Hayden party that explored the region in 1872. This couple impressed the explorers to the extent that they named the lakes in their honor.