• Grand Palace

    Great Basin

    National Park Nevada

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  • Snake Creek Road and Campsites Closed

    The Snake Creek Road will be closed from the park boundary into the park to begin work on campsites, trails and restroom improvements. Work will continue until snow closes the project. Work will resume in Spring 2015.

  • Astronomy Programs to Resume August 23rd

    After a safety review Astronmy Programs will begin again on a trial basis on August 23rd. More »

  • Road Work at Great Basin National Park

    Beginning July 8, 2014 and continuing through the end of August there will be road work at Great Basin National Park on paved roads throughout the park. Delays of 10 minutes or less may occur. Updated 8/12/2014 More »

Pine Nut Gathering

pine nut

Pinyon pine nuts

Alana Dimmick

Gathering pinyon pine nuts is a wonderful way to experience the fall bounty of Great Basin National Park. The singleaf pinyon, Pinus monophylla, is an abundant tree found in mixed stands with Utah juniper between 6,000 and 9,000 feet. It is the only species of pine on the continent with single needles.

The nuts produced by these pines are delicious and nutritious. They have been important to Native Americans and animals for millenia. The pine nuts commonly purchased in gourmet food stores are typically those of the Colorado pinyon, but the nuts of the singleleaf pinyon are equally tasty.

Gathering pine nuts within Great Basin National Park is allowed in the fall only, and subject to the following regulations. The goal is to ensure that impact to the park is minimized and that plenty of nuts remain for Clark's nutcrackers, pinyon jays, and ground squirrels.

  • Pinyon pine nuts may be gathered and removed from the park only for personal non-commercial use.
  • Limits are: 25 lbs per household per year or 3 gunnysacks of cones per household per year. When laid flat, each gunnysack must be no larger than two feet by three feet. Those found in possession of pine nuts or cones in excess of these amounts may be cited and the pine nuts and cones will be confiscated.
  • Parking is allowed only in gravel or paved parking areas. Do not drive or park off-road. All-terrain vehicles and other off-road vehicles are strictly prohibited.
  • Breaking branches, cutting, pulling, shaking, climbing, or otherwise injuring pines or other plants is illegal.
  • Only free standing ladders may be used for picking.

Happy gathering!

Did You Know?

non-native plant, cheatgrass

One of the major ecological threats to the sagebrush-dominated Great Basin ecosystem is the introduction and spread of dozens of species of non-native plants. The most important of these, cheatgrass (or downy brome) covers the largest area: 25 million acres, one-third of the area of the Great Basin.