• Night skies over Great Basin National Park

    Great Basin

    National Park Nevada

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  • Road Work at Great Basin National Park

    Road work will begin in Upper Lehman and Wheeler Peak Campgrounds. Campgrounds will be open but may be noisy and have large vehicles on the roads. The Scenic Drive is open with up to 15 min delays due to road work. Click more for details. Updated 9/9/14 More »

  • Snake Creek Road and Campsites Closed

    The Snake Creek Road will be closed from the park boundary into the park to begin work on campsites, trails and restroom improvements. Work will continue until snow closes the project. Work will resume in Spring 2015.

Permits

Some recreational activities in the park require permits; for others registration is recommended.

Information on permits required for research, filming or photography, or other business related topics can be found under Doing Business With the Park.

Backcountry Camping Backcountry camping does not require a permit, but registration is free and strongly recommended. Stop at a visitor center to register and obtain a copy of the regulations. Registration not only allows the park to monitor use, but also provides critical information in the event of an emergency.

>More Information on Hiking and Backpacking

 

Climbing Technical climbing registration is voluntary at Great Basin National Park. However, climbers are strongly encouraged to register, especially those attempting any of the alpine routes. Registration forms provide crucial information for rescue personnel. Leaders may register for climbs at the visitor center.

>More information on Technical Climbing

 

Caving There is one wild caves in the park that is accessible with a caving permit. Those who are interested in caving can submit a Cave Permit Application for approval. Permits will be approved for those who can demonstrate through the application process their experience with horizontal and vertical caving techniques, cave conservation ethics, and expertise with the required equipment.

White Nose Syndrome
White-Nose Syndrome (WNS) is a fungal disease that has killed more than 1 million bats in the U.S. and Canada. WNS is named for the white fungus that grows around infected bat's faces and other body parts. It was first documented in the winter of 2006-2007 in upstate New York and has since spread as far west as Oklahoma and as far south as North Carolina. White-nose syndrome has been linked to the fungus Geomyces destructans and results in bats exhibiting abnormal behavior during winter months such as flying during the day and clustering near entrances. In some hibernacula (caves or mines where bats spend the winter) 90 to 100 percent of the bats have died. This epidemic has been called one of the greatest wildlife disasters in our nation's history. Bats make up over 20% of the mammal species on Earth and save the U.S. agricultural industry over 3 billion dollars a year in pest-control services.

Permits must be applied for at least one week prior to the cave trip and must be in your possession while caving.

Caving Information and Permit Application

Applications can be mailed to:

Resource Management

Great Basin National Park

100 Great Basin National Park

Baker, NV 89311





For questions, please contact Resource Management by email or by phone at (775) 234-7561.

>More information on Caving

 
Picnicking
Upper Lehman Group Picnic area is available by reservation. A special use permit is required and must be applied for at least two weeks in advance. A $25 application fee must accompany the application. The fee for use of the area is $50. Maximum group size is 75. Call (775) 234-7511 for reservations and information.

Did You Know?

Bighorn Sheep

Cattle grazing was eliminated from Great Basin National Park in 1999. The South Snake Range is still home to 10-15 Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep.