• Grand Palace

    Great Basin

    National Park Nevada

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  • Road Work at Great Basin National Park

    Beginning July 8, 2014 and continuing through the end of August there will be road work at Great Basin National Park on paved roads throughout the park. Delays of 10 minutes or less may occur. Updated 7/29/2014 More »

  • Astronomy Programs on Hold

    Astronomy programs are on hold while a safety review is completed for visitor and staff safety. Check back soon for an update when the programs will start again. More »

Reptiles

Reptiles are often the animals people think of when one says the word "desert". The Great Basin Desert is higher in elevation than the other North American deserts. Winter temperatures can be cold, yet summer days are hot. Like most deserts, there can be a vast temperature difference between daytime high temperatures and nighttime low temperatures. Reptiles are "cold-blooded" and must regulate their body temperature by seeking out shade in the summer and warm dens in the winter. Snakes, especially rattlesnakes, are among the best-known of the Great Basin reptiles.

>Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Great Basin National Park & Vicinity (640 KB PDF)

>Reptile Poster (1,876 KB PDF)

Did You Know?

Bonneville Cutthroat Trout

The Bonneville cutthroat trout is the only trout native to Great Basin National Park and East Central Nevada. Ancestors of the current Bonneville cutthroat trout were abundant in ancient Lake Bonneville 16,000 to 18,000 years ago, the remnant of what is now the Great Salt Lake in Utah.