• Officers at Fort Jay, 1912.

    Governors Island

    National Monument New York

Management

Fort Jay: Special Orders for Prisoner Guards, August 1959

After World War II, most of the soldiers at Fort Jay were military police who directed traffic, kept order on the island and guarded prisoners at Castle Williams under these orders.

NPS Museum collection GOIS-0117.

The National Park Service cares for special places saved by the American People so that all may experience our heritage. To do that we have laws and policies that point the direction, plans to do the specific things and friends and partners that share a common vision about those special places.

Our Partners - Here are a listing of groups and organizations that share an interest in Governors Island National Monument

Laws & Policies - Presidental proclaimations establishing Governors Island National Monument in 2001 and 2003 are located here. Also find our park compendium of monument-specific rules and regulations on public use and activities.

Park Planning - Our long range plan, a general management plan approved in 2007, can be found here.

Special Use Permits - Information and application forms for using Governors Island National Monument for commercial filming, artistic exhibits and installations or special events.

Did You Know?

U.S. Army Air Corps Colonel Hap Arnold in the 1930s.

Henry “Hap” Arnold (1886-1950), a founding father of the modern U.S. Air Force, got the itch to fly while a second lieutenant in the infantry at Fort Jay in 1909, watching biplanes take off and land on Governors Island. His commanding officer told him that he knew of no better way to commit suicide. In 1911, he learned to fly with the Wright brothers and would go on to become the first five-star general of the Army Air Corps and the first and only five star general of the U.S. Air Force.