• Sunset view of Glacier Bay and the surrounding Fairweather Mountains.

    Glacier Bay

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

Disposal of human waste in undeveloped areas of Glacier Bay National Park

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Date: March 8, 2012
Contact: Albert Faria – Chief Ranger, 907-697-2621

The GLBA Superintendent Susan L. Boudreau has announced that the 2012 superintendent's compendium current regulation on disposing of human waste in the Wilderness is currently under review.  Currently the 2012 compendium regulation reads:

2.14(a) (9) Sanitation: designated areas for disposal of human waste in undeveloped areas.

When the ground is not frozen, human feces must be either packed out or deposited in a "cathole" dug 6-8 inches deep in soil at least 100 feet from any water source, shoreline, campsite or trail. When the ground is frozen, human feces must be disposed over at least 100 feet from any water source and covered with snow or packed out. Tissue paper and sanitary items should be buried, burned or packed out.

Superintendent Boudreau would like to announce that implementation for the above compendium regulation will not be implemented for calendar year 2012. This would allow for disposal of human waste within the intertidal zone for the 2012 season. This period would allow for public comment regarding the proper disposal method of human waste in undeveloped areas of Glacier Bay National Park. This would also allow the NPS to research various disposal methods and impacts and prepare for a potential change to the 2013 Glacier Bay National Park compendium.

Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve welcomes all visitors to enjoy the wonders of Glacier Bay and its many resources.

Did You Know?

John Muir

John Muir, beloved naturalist and father of Yosemite National Park, came to Glacier Bay in 1879 to find direct evidence of the presence of glaciers. He believed that Yosemite had been carved by glacier and was able to validate his hypothesis with what he saw in Glacier Bay.