• Sunset view of Glacier Bay and the surrounding Fairweather Mountains.

    Glacier Bay

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

Bear Advisory For The Point Of Land Between Queen And Rendu Inlets

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
Date: July 17, 2009
Contact: Allison Banks, Public Information Officer, 907-697-2230

This notice is to inform campers  of recent bear activity at the mouth of Queen and Rendu Inlets.  On July 11, three kayakers camping on the point of land between the inlets encountered a single subadult brown bear who investigated their property and caused minor damage to gear stored in their kayaks.  The campers attempted to deter the bear by yelling and waving arms but the bear did not leave the area until the campers packed up and left.  On July 14, a different party of three encountered a bear of similar description in the same vicinity.  The bear  investigated and chewed on closed bear canisters until the campers scared it off  by yelling and banging on their kayaks.   

Campers are advised to avoid camping  in this area to avoid further bear-human conflicts.  Campers are reminded that bears range widely throughout the park and that bear-human conflicts can occur anywhere.  Two important keys to minimizing the potential for conflicts include storing food and attractants properly and keeping control of gear and property at all times.  Please report all bear encounters to the Visitor Information Station.  Visitors to Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve are advised to contact the park’s Visitor Information Station (907-697-2627) for the most current information regarding bear incidents in the area.

This advisory will remain in effect until August 17, 2009.

Did You Know?

Pacific Spiny Lumpsucker

The Pacific Spiny Lumpsucker is a favorite discovery for divers in Southeast Alaska. They are poor swimmers, spending much of their time attached to the bottom by a sucker evolved from pelvic fins.