• Mt Reynolds

    Glacier

    National Park Montana

Please View Wildlife from Safe Distance

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Date: July 1, 2013
Contact: Denise Germann, 406 888-5838
Contact: Jennifer Lutman, 406 888-7895

WEST GLACIER, MONT. – Distance requirements between people and wildlife in Glacier National Park have been implemented to prevent negative human-wildlife encounters and decrease wildlife habituation. Visitors are required to keep a distance of at least 100 yards from bears and wolves, and 25 yards from any other wildlife including nesting birds.

Acting Glacier National Park Superintendent Kym Hall said, "One of the values of Glacier National Park is the opportunity to view a diversity of wildlife." Visitor and animal safety is a priority and Hall asks visitors to respect the viewing distances identified.

Animals in Glacier National Park are wild and their behavior is often unpredictable. Maintaining a safe distance from wildlife is necessary for visitor and animal safety. Disturbance to wildlife can inflict major stress on populations, especially animals with young. Visitors are encouraged to use binoculars, spotting scopes, or telephoto lenses for safe wildlife viewing. Always use designated roadside pullouts when viewing wildlife from your vehicle.

Willfully disturbing or interfering with the unimpeded movement of wildlife is illegal within any distance. Failure to comply with park wildlife protection regulations may result in a fine and/or required court appearance.   This regulation is consistent with other national parks, including Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks.

Approved management or research activities or persons in compliance with approved written protocol may be exempt from the regulations.

Specific information about the wildlife protection and distance regulations can be found in the Glacier National Park 2013 Compendium which is located on the park's website at http://www.nps.gov/glac/parkmgmt/lawsandpolicies.htm 

- NPS -

Did You Know?

Snow can fall at any time of the year in Glacier

Did you know that eight inches of snow fell during one night in Glacier's high country in August, 2005? The weather forced hundreds of backpackers out of the backcountry.