• Sunken Road, Stone Wall and Innis House

    Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania

    National Military Park Virginia

For Kids

Photo Courtesy of Caity Stuart

Children participating in a Living History Demonstration at Chatham Manor.

Photo by Caity Stuart

For special kids programs offered this summer, check our special events page: http://www.nps.gov/frsp/special.htm

Want to learn more about the battlefields in Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park? Do you know how to preserve and protect these sacred places like the National Park Service does?

There are countless ways to learn about our battlefields and to be involved in taking care of them. Visit the park, take a hike on one of our trails, read a book about the Civil War, or ask your teacher about Civil War battlefields. Become a Junior Ranger to explore the history of the park and its battlefields and to learn how to preserve our grounds.

Want to help out?

If you live in the area, visit the battlefields, and take the time to see what changes between your visits. Pick up a piece of trash that someone may have left behind--and always remember to pick up after yourself. Come to our special events, and see a cannon firing demonstration or talk with living history soldiers. When you're older, consider volunteering with the park.

If you're from far away, visit the park and bring back memories to your friends and family. Share our park's story with classmates. Read more about the Civil War and the individuals involved in the battles--men, women, and children. Help keep our park clean, too, when you visit. Check out the webrangers program, if you can't make it to the park. When you're older, look into the park's internship program, if you'd like to study history and work at the park.

Always remember: because they are part of a national park, these battlefields belong to you. It's up to us to make sure their stories continue to be told. Don't forget those who lived and fought here, and remember to take care of this ground.

 

Did You Know?

General U.S. Grant

During the Wildereness Campaign, General George Gordon Meade commanded the Union Army of the Potomac. General U.S. Grant, who commanded all Union armies, accompanied this army into the Wilderness.