• Pa-Hay-okee Overlook

    Everglades

    National Park Florida

SFNRC Offices

Ecosystem Restoration
South Florida Ecosystem Office
950 N. Krome Avenue
Homestead, FL 33030-4443
Phone: (305) 224-4200
Fax: (305) 224-4147

Center staff located at the South Florida Ecosystem Office work primarily on ecosystem restoration initiatives in south Florida. Our scientists are conducting studies to establish restoration goals, evaluate the impacts of proposed actions, and track restoration success by monitoring environmental response.

 

Natural Resources Management
Daniel Beard Center, Everglades National Park
40001 State Road 9336
Homestead, FL 33034
Phone: (305) 242-7800
Fax: (305) 242-7836

The Daniel Beard Center provides the base for most of the field work done in Everglades National Park by Center staff, including natural resource management and inventory and monitoring activities. Several US Geological Service scientists are co-located here.

 

Water Quality
Water Quality & Everglades Program Team
c/o A.R.M. Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge
10216 Lee Road
Boynton Beach, FL 33437-9741
Phone: (561) 735-6000
Fax: (561) 735-6008

Located at the Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, the Water Quality Office houses most of the staff in the Water Quality group. Scientists in this group conduct and oversee contracted water quality research on phosphorus levels in the Everglades. These NPS scientists, together with our sister agency, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, also take part in the DOI Everglades Program Team. This interagency team serves the DOI and its affiliates with increased scientific capacity related to the impacts of water quality on south Florida restoration efforts.

 

Florida Bay Science
Florida Bay Interagency Science Center
98630 Overseas Hwy.
Key Largo, FL 33037
Phone: (305) 852-0324 x0327
Fax: (305) 852-0325

The Florida Bay Interagency Science Center provides the base for research, natural resource management, and inventory and monitoring activities associated with Florida Bay and the Dry Tortugas. Partners in this office include the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the South Florida Water Management District.

Did You Know?

Wood Stork

A pair of endangered wood storks need about 440 pounds of fish during a breeding season to feed themselves and their young. Everglades National Park serves as an important nursery ground for raising their chicks.