• Pa-Hay-okee Overlook

    Everglades

    National Park Florida

CESI Monitoring Project 97-7

 

Status and Conservation of the American Crocodile in Florida: Recovering an Endangered Species While Restoring an Endangered Ecosystem
Frank J. Mazzotti & Michael S. Cherkiss

 
Juvenile Crocodile Among the Mangrove Roots
Juvenile Crocodile Among the Roots of a Red Mangrove
Courtesy of Frank J. Mazzotti & Michael S. Cherkiss
 

Afforded Federal protection in 1975, the threatened American crocodile, Crocodylus acutus, once faced a grim prognosis for recovery. Loss of suitable nesting areas and modifications to freshwater flows served to dramatically reduce the abundance of the species. today, as the process of Everglades restoration moves forward, the American crocodile may prove a valuable touchstone against which to measure our success.

This project examined the full suite of available monitoring data from the past three decades to provide a more comprehensive understanding of recovery and restoration. It is noted that C. acutus is now more abundant, and found in more places, than at the time of it was listing under the Endangered Species Act. While this will likely bring new management challenges in the face of a burgeoning population, it is also noted that there may also be new opportunities for species recovery.

 
 

Final Report

 
Final Report Cover

Full Project Report
(PDF, 1.9 MB)
 
 
 

Contact the principal investigator directly with questions about this study.

Did You Know?

Ibis in Flight

In the 1800s John James Audubon noted that the sky was often darkened by the flocks of numerous birds above. Since the early 20th century, around 93% of the wading bird population has vanished. Much of the wildlife left in south Florida depends on Everglades National Park for a home.