• pond surrounded by green brush, reflecting a distant range of snow-covered mountains that are dominated by one massive mountain

    Denali

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

Denali Overflights Advisory Council Meeting on September 10

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Date: September 2, 2010
Contact: Maureen McLaughlin, (907) 773-9103

The eighth meeting of the Denali National Park Aircraft Overflights Advisory Council will take place on Friday, September 10 from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the Murie Science and Learning Center, located in Denali National Park. The meeting is open to the public with time allocated for public testimony. Written comments are also welcome and can be brought to the meeting or mailed to Miriam Valentine, Talkeetna Ranger Station, P.O. Box 588, Talkeetna, AK 99676.

The Denali National Park Aircraft Overflights Advisory Council advises the Superintendent, through the Secretary of the Interior, on mitigation efforts that should be made to reduce the impacts from aircraft overflights at Denali National Park and Preserve. The group is developing voluntary measures for assuring the safety of passengers, pilots, and mountaineers and for achieving desired future resource conditions at Denali that were outlined in the 2006 Backcountry Management Plan. Council membership contains broad representation of interested stakeholders and has a balance of local, state, and national interests.

Information on the Advisory Council can be found at http://www.nps.gov/dena/parkmgmt/currentprojects.htm

Information on Denali's 2006 Backcountry Management Plan is located at http://www.nps.gov/dena/parkmgmt/gmp.htm

 

For additional information on the meeting, please contact Miriam Valentine at (907) 733-9102 or via email at miriam_valentine@nps.gov.

Did You Know?

scenic image of a green plain bisected by a thin river, mountains and clouds in the distance

Cold temperatures limit trees from growing at high elevation in Denali. Warmer temperatures, however, have led to woody vegetation growing at ever-higher elevations. Treeline changes are a conspicuous sign of climate change.