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    Denali

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Denali Pro Award Winners Announced

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Date: April 22, 2008
Contact: Maureen McLaughlin, (907) 733-9103

The National Park Service (NPS) and Pigeon Mountain Industries (PMI) recognize mountaineering guides Heidi Kloos and Robert Durnell of Mountain Trip International as joint recipients of the Denali Pro Award for their selfless assistance to fellow climbers during a May 2007 rescue effort.

Since its inception in 1998, the Denali Pro program has honored members of the climbing community for exhibiting high standards for safety, self-sufficiency, Leave No Trace ethics, and assisting fellow mountaineers. Throughout each climbing season, rangers award worthy individuals with a Denali Pro lapel pin, the design of which changes from year to year. At the end of each season, mountaineering rangers collectively select a Denali Pro Award winner from the list of pin recipients. The winner, or winners in the event a team is selected, receive a specialized trophy, and their name is added to the Denali Pro Award plaque on display at the Talkeetna Ranger Station. Kloos and Durnell will be presented with their Denali Pro Awards on April 28, 2008 at an informal ceremony at the Talkeetna Ranger Station.

Kloos and Durnell were positioned at the 17,200-foot camp on Mt. McKinley when they witnessed two climbers from another expedition suffer a 2,000 foot fall on May 17, 2007. The two guides immediately volunteered assistance to the NPS and were assigned to the hasty team that was dispatched to evaluate the situation. Upon arrival at the accident site, the hasty team determined that one of the two climbers had died in the fall, while the other was in serious condition with a compromised airway and active bleeding. The two guides were instrumental in assisting the NPS mountaineering staff in emergency medical treatment and preparation of the surviving patient for evacuation back to the 17,200-foot camp.

After the evacuation was underway, Kloos and Durnell remained at the accident site to secure the deceased climber’s remains for later recovery. On their own volition, they also collected and consolidated the various personal effects that were strewn throughout the fall zone. These difficult tasks were crucial to the eventual recovery effort, as the scene was quickly getting covered by drifting snow and 30 mph winds. Once the personal effects were secured and marked, the two returned to the 17,200-foot camp where they initiated the preparation of food and water for all rescue personnel, as well as the preparation of hot water bottles to help warm the surviving patient. Although the injured climber died the following morning without regaining consciousness, the contributions of Kloos and Durnell helped ensure that everything possible was done in the attempt save the patient.

South District Ranger Daryl Miller said “The efforts of Mountain Trip guides Heidi Kloos and Robert Durnell exemplify the quality of character that the Denali Pro Award seeks to recognize. We thank them for their hard work, and we also thank PMI for helping sustain this important award program.”

Kloos and Durnell join the following list of past award recipients:

Year

Denali Pro Award Recipients

1998

Adrian Nature

1999

Michal Krissak

2000

John Mislow
Andrew Swanson

2001

Adam Clark
Dave Hahn
Dave Hanning
Matt Helliker

2002

Thomas Lammle

2003

Paul Roderick

2004

Neil McNab
Andy Perkins

2005

Clark Fyans

2006

Not Awarded

2007

Robert Durnell
Heidi Kloos



For background information on former Denali Pro Award winners, go to www.nps.gov/dena and look to the respective Annual Mountaineering Summaries under the “Mountaineering Information” link. 

Did You Know?

a moose with small antlers amid brush

Warmer average temperatures over several decades have resulted in expansion of woody vegetation. If this warming trend continues, it will change Alaska's ecosystems and drastically alter the physical appearance of Denali's landscape, as treeline marches higher up the mountains.