• pond surrounded by green brush, reflecting a distant range of snow-covered mountains that are dominated by one massive mountain

    Denali

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

History & Culture

montage of five images, showing a man digging a hole, a dirt road winding through green hills towards a white mountain, an old pair of snowshoes, a dilapidated cabin and cart, and a Native Alaskan woman filleting a fish
L to R: prehistoric archeology, landscape of the park road and Denali, crampons from museum collection, historic mining structures, and subsistence activity (processing fish harvest)
NPS photos
 

Subsistence Opportunities

The subsistence program at Denali helps protect the opportunity for qualified local rural residents to continue traditional subsistence activities. The program ensures management of park resources to be consistent with conservation of unimpaired ecosystems and natural and healthy populations of fish and wildlife. Management incorporates traditional ecological knowledge with scientific data and principles. Learn more about subsistence use of animals and the land in Denali.


Understanding and Protecting the Human History of Denali

The Cultural Resources program at Denali documents and shares the stories of people and the land, now and in the past, and helps preserve places and objects with special history. People have made their homes on lands now within park boundaries for perhaps as long as 12,000 years.

Learn about Denali's archeology program

Discover how people use this land

  • Alaska Natives in and near Denali
  • Early explorers and expeditions
  • Mountaineering
  • Subsistence activities today

Read up on park history

  • Historic Structures
  • Historic Themes
  • Park Administrative History
  • Denali Park Road
  • Interviews and Transcripts

Delve into Denali's museum collections

Find out how we protect Denali's cultural resources

  • Buildings and Bridges, Cabins and Cairns
  • Inventories and Condition Assessments
  • Section 106 and the National Historic Register
 

Did You Know?

three brown snowshoe hares

Natural sound is a matter of life and death to animals relying on complex communications. Intrusions of noise can adversely impact some wildlife, and some visitors' experiences. Denali soundscapes have been monitored since 2000, to help park managers understand Denali's natural sounds