• Image of bluebells in the spring

    Cuyahoga Valley

    National Park Ohio

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Valley Bridle Trail Partial Closure

    A section of the Valley Bridle Trail is closed across from the Brandywine Golf Course. There is no estimate of when this section will be open. Please observe all trail closures. More »

  • Plateau Trail Partial Closure

    The outer loop of the Plateau Trail is closed at the Valley Picnic Area junction for bridge repair. The bridge is now unsafe for pedestrian traffice due to accelerated erosion around the base. More »

  • Bald Eagle Closure in Effect Until July 31, 2014

    Returning bald eagles are actively tending to last year's nest within the Pinery Narrows area in CVNP. To protect the eagles from human disturbance, the area surrounding the nest tree will be closed until July 31, 2014. More »

  • Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad (CVSR) Bridge Construction Closures

    Rockside and Canal Visitor Center boarding sites will be closed through Apr 27. From Jan 18 - Mar 16, CVSR will operate between Akron Northside and Brecksville stations. From Mar 22 - Apr, CVSR will operate between Akron Northside and Peninsula. More »

  • Do Not Feed the Waterfowl and Birds!

    Many people enjoy feeding waterfowl and birds, but the effects of this seemingly generous act can be harmful. Regular feeding can cause: unatural behavior, pollution, overcrowding, delayed migration, and poor nutrition and disease.

  • Closure on Fishing Will Remain in Effect for Virginia Kendall Lake

    Due to the government shutdown, we were unable to survey the fish community in VK Lake as scheduled. Our survey partners (ODNR) will not be able to get into the lake until early spring of 2014. Therefore, the closure on fishing will remain in effect. More »

Life on the Farm

Crosier family with barn.
Courtesy/Bath Township Historical Society
 
Tapping sap from maple trees.

Gathering maple sap from buckets, 1927.

Courtesy/Cleveland Press Collection

Life on the farm revolved around the seasons. Each season brought its own chores and tasks that needed to be done to keep food on the table, a roof overhead, and the farm functioning.

The year might begin with the farmers in the woodlot cutting timber or in the pond cutting ice. Later, maple trees needed tapping for sap to make syrup. Spring meant plowing and planting and, for the farmer's wife, churning butter. Summer brought weeding and hoeing, followed by more weeding and then harvesting. The farmer's wife gathered garden produce to preserve, gel, salt, pickle, dry, or put up. Fall brought the harvesting of wheat, corn, oats, and the remaining garden produce. The fall ended with butchering— more time in the kitchen for the farmer's wife. Throughout the winter, grains were threshed and equipment was repaired for another season's use. And, for most, each Sunday brought a day of rest after a long week at work.

Click the links to the left to learn more about what it was like to live and work on several prominent farms in the Cuyahoga Valley.

Click to read a first-hand account of life on the Stanford Farm in the 1920s.

 
Oral history audio.

In Their Own Words
Click the topic to hear a story about Cuyahoga Valley life.
Click here to read the text file.

Seasonal Farm Activities (2 minutes 12 seconds)
Laura DeYoung talks about seasonal activities and events on The Spicy Lamb Farm.


Did You Know?

Dragonfly image by NPS volunteer John Catalano.

Dragonflies and damselflies look almost alike while flying. However, if you wait until they land, dragonflies lay their wings to the side while damselflies lay them back and above their bodies.