• View of the Great Rift

    Craters Of The Moon

    National Monument & Preserve Idaho

National Park Foundation Grant

pronghorn
Pronghorn migrating through Craters of the Moon

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News Release Date: July 24, 2012
Contact: John Apel, CRMO, 208-527-1350
Contact: Marjorie Hall, NPF, 202-354-6480

Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve Receives Grant from the National Park Foundation to Support Interactive and Engaging Projects That Will Strengthen Americans' Connection with Their National Parks

The National Park Foundation, the official charity of America's national parks, is proud to award Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve a 2012 Impact Grant to support the launch of Passage for Pronghorn, a project that modifies or replaces boundary fences to enhance pronghorn migration. The grant is part of the National Park Foundation's Impact Grant program which gives parks the critical financial support needed to transform innovative, yet underfunded ideas into successful in-park programs and initiatives.

"This grant allows us to expand our ongoing efforts to either remove or modify fencing in an important pronghorn migration corridor", said Dan Buckley, Superintendent at Craters of the Moon. "The National Park Service will partner with the Utah Conservation Corps to give young adults an opportunity to engage in a project directly benefiting the wildlife we're mandated to conserve."

The National Park Service hopes to modify or replace all eight miles of boundary fence at Craters of the Moon by the Centennial of the National Park System in 2016. New fencing will adopt designs intended to allow safer crossing by pronghorn, which do not readily jump fences and have particular difficulty crossing the mesh wire fences installed decades ago to exclude sheep. The new fencing design includes markers to improve the visibility of wire strands to wildlife, including sage grouse, and reduce wildlife collisions. This week a four person crew from the Utah Conservation Corps began work to replace one half mile of fence within the migration corridor.

"With these strategic grants, we have been able to positively impact hundreds of national parks across the country," said Neil Mulholland, President and CEO of the National Park Foundation. "This unique program helps the parks enhance the visitor experience, engaging more people, and ultimately building a stronger community of park enthusiasts who share an appreciation and commitment to protecting America's Best Idea, their national parks."  

The National Park Foundation, in partnership with ARAMARK through the Yawkey Foundation, The Fernandez Pave the Way Foundation and The HISTORY Channel, awarded Impact Grant grants to 62 national parks across the country totaling more than $500,000.

A full list of grantees is available on the National Park Foundation website.

ABOUT Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve
Craters of the Moon has been described as a sea of lava flows with scattered islands of cinder cones and sagebrush. Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve contains three young lava fields covering almost half a million acres. These remarkably well preserved volcanic features resulted from geologic events that appear to have happened yesterday and are likely to continue in the future... www.nps.gov/crmo.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL PARK FOUNDATION
You are the owner of 84 million acres of the world's most treasured memorials, landscapes, ecosystems, and historic sites -- all protected in America's nearly 400 national parks. Chartered by Congress, the National Park Foundation is the official charity of America's national parks. We work hand in hand with the National Park Service to connect you and all Americans to the parks, and to make sure that they are preserved for the generations who will follow. Join us in supporting your national parks -- this is your land. www.nationalparks.org.
 
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Did You Know?

Did You Know?

Watch out for bombs! Before they cooled, volcanic bombs were hot globs of lava that were hurled from volcanoes along the Great Rift. They form a variety of interesting shapes described as "breadcrust", "spindle" and "ribbons" by geologists. More...