• Mist rising of the river at Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area.

    Chattahoochee River

    National Recreation Area Georgia

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  • Rising River Waters Can Kill!

    Watch for rapidly rising river levels on the Chattahoochee River and its tributaries. Water released from dams and heavy rain can turn a day on the river into a tragedy! More »

  • Call for Water Release Schedule

    With colder temperatures you can expect longer and more frequent water releases. For water release schedule info, call 1-855-DAM-FLOW (1-855-326-3569) for Buford Dam and 404-329-1455 for Morgan Falls Dam. Save numbers to your cell! More »

Fishing

Fishing the Chattahoochee River year-round for its trout, bass, catfish, and other species can be a great experience. The river stays a cool temperature year-round, rarely getting warmer than 50 degrees Fahrenheit. The river within the park is open for fishing from 30 minutes before sunrise until 30 minutes after sunset. Night fishing is not permitted in the park.

Anglers need to follow Georgia fishing regulations. A valid Georgia fishing license is required for anglers age 16 and older. Additionally, all resident anglers ages 16 to 64 and nonresident anglers age 16 or older must have a trout stamp. Visit the Georgia Department of Natural Resources website for more information about fishing license.

Since the Chattahoochee River is a designated trout stream from Buford Dam to the mouth of Peachtree Creek, including Bull Sluice Lake, special trout regulations apply. The use of live bait-fish in the river is prohibited within the park. Seining the river for bait-fish is also prohibited within the park. Anglers must fish with only one rod per person. Anglers are also required to possess a trout stamp even if they are fishing for other species. Learn all about fishing regulations from the Georgia Department of Natural Resources website.

Did You Know?

Island Ford Visitor Center - Photo by Matt Harr

The Island Ford Visitor Contact Station was once the Summer family home of former Georgia Superior Court Judge Samuel Hewlett. Construction began in the 1930's, using timber from the Okeefenokee Swamp and stone from Stone Mountain, taking six years to complete.