• Chunks of melting sea ice along a shoreline and subsistence camps on the beach in the background.

    Cape Krusenstern

    National Monument Alaska

Frequently Asked Questions

What designations are associated with Cape Krusenstern National Monument?
Boundary Change - December 2, 1980
National Monument - December 1, 1978

Where can I camp in Cape Krusenstern National Monument and do I need a permit?
Visitors may generally camp anywhere on NPS lands as long as they do not damage resources. No camping permit is required. Visitors are reminded that cabins, tent frames, fish racks and other improvements are usually indications of private lands. Please respect these sites and avoid trespassing on them.

Can I hunt in Cape Krusenstern National Monument?
Sport hunting is prohibited in national parks and monuments. Only local rural residents of the NANA Region may hunt in Cape Krusenstern National Monument.

Who can take me on a trip in the monument?
Any businesses, such as guides and transporters operating in the monument, must have a current permit from the National Park Service. Please refer to the current list of commercial use authorizations for a choice of services.

Can I drive to the monument?
There are no roads to the monument. The trip from Kotzebue to the monument is a short ½ hour flight in a small aircraft over Kotzebue Sound.

Is there lodging available in Cape Krusenstern National Monument?
There are no accommodations or public facilities with in the monument. Backcountry camping is the only way to spend the night.

How far is it from Anchorage to Cape Krusenstern National Monument?
Kotzebue is 550 miles north of Anchorage. From Kotzebue, it is only 30 miles to travel across the sound to the monument.

Are there any endangered species in Cape Krusenstern National Monument?
The Eskimo Curlew is listed as endangered and most likely extinct. Spectacled Eiders and Steller’s Eiders are both threatened species of sea ducks.

When are the mosquitoes really active?
June and July seem to be the best months for mosquitoes. Birds and other insect eaters are fat and happy, but people are usually less enthusiastic. Plan to cover up or use repellant. Typically, there are fewer insects of all kinds in August and September.

Can I conduct research in the monument?
All research proposals on National Park Service land need to be reviewed by park staff before a permit is granted. To learn more or get started on the application process, visit the following website: https://science1.nature.nps.gov/research/ac/ResearchIndex

How many people visit Cape Krusenstern National Monument each year?
Statistics on visitor use and population are collected throughout the year. Many “visitors” are local residents traveling through the monument from village to village or for subsistence activities. Since there is no entrance gate collecting data on this population, the visitor statistics for this group are an estimate. Information is available through the following website: http://www2.nature.nps.gov/stats/

Is there a fee to get in the monument?
Cape Krusenstern National Monument does not have an entrance gate, nor does it collect any fees to travel or camp in the monument.

Where can I get my official passport stamp for the monument?
Passport stamps are available at the National Park Service offices in Kotzebue and Nome. The stamps are also available at the Innaigvik Education and Information Center in Kotzebue in the summer. The staff in Kotzebue and Nome can also mail a stamped paper to your postal address if you are unable to visit any of the offices.

Did You Know?

Image of boats docked near Kotzebue

Local residents around Cape Krusenstern National Monument still hunt sea mammals such as beluga whales, which provide highly prized white muktuk.