• Spring-time view of the seashore, with shorebirds returning to the surf.

    Cape Hatteras

    National Seashore North Carolina

Current Interactive Beach Access Map using Google Earth

Google Earth is a virtual globe program that maps the earth by the superimposition of images obtained from satellite imagery, aerial photography and GIS 3D globe. The viewer is available for free download at Google Earth. The product is designed for use on newer computers with broadband or higher levels of connection.

You can click on this updated daily beach access map link and zoom-in to the shoreline area in which you are interested to see the current access status. The color-coded "access line" indicates the status of shoreline access at the time the map was updated and is based on recent GPS coordinates of the actual shoreline. The underlying photo image is dated and may not accurately reflect the current location of the shoreline. Closure conditions may change in the field on short notice. On-site signage, rather than the Google Earth map, is the most accurate and current indication of what is open or closed to the public. Closed areas are clearly marked in the field with closure signs or "symbolic fencing" consisting of posts, closure signs, string and flagging tape. Knowledge of tidal changes and caution should be exercised while traveling the beaches of the park.

Please Note: As you close Google Earth, the program will ask you if you wish to save these items in My Places. To ensure that you continue to view the most current beach access map, select "Discard".

References to non-U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) products do not constitute an endorsement by the DOI. By viewing the Google Maps API on this web site the user agrees to these Terms of Service set forth by Google.

 

Did You Know?

The Principal Lightkeeper's Quarters and the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse move toward their new homes, a safer distance from the ocean.

The Cape Hatteras Lighthouse is the tallest brick structure ever moved. When it was built in 1870, it stood 1,500 feet from the shore. By 1999, the lighthouse was within 100 feet of the ocean. To protect it from the encroaching sea, it was moved inland a total of 2,900 feet over a 23-day period.