• Spring-time view of the seashore, with shorebirds returning to the surf.

    Cape Hatteras

    National Seashore North Carolina

Shorebird Protection Area Modified Near Avon

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Date: June 25, 2014
Contact: Outer Banks Group, 252-475-9034

Superintendent Barclay Trimble announced today a modification management activity for a shorebird protection area adjacent to private homes at the north end of the village of Avon.Over the weekend, a single pair of least terns established a nest south of the existing prenesting area located south of Ramp 34.The single nest was directly in front of several oceanfront cottages.

In accordance with the terms of the Off-Road Vehicle Management Plan, "when scrape(s), nest(s), or chicks(s) occur in the immediate vicinity of paved roads, parking lots, campgrounds, buildings, and other facilities, such as within the villages or at National Park Service (NPS) developed sites, the NPS retains the discretion to provide resource protection to the extent possible while still allowing those facilities to remain operational."The management plan further states, "Regardless of the nature of the adjacent facilities, in all cases, as a minimum, NPS would provide signs, fencing and reduced buffers to protect nest(s) and chick(s) once they occur.""Buffers will remain in place for 2 weeks after a nest is lost to determine if the pair (of birds) will re-nest."

For more information on beach access in Cape Hatteras National Seashore, see:

http://www.nps.gov/caha/planyourvisit/off-road-vehicle-use.htm or call 252-475-9034.

-NPS-

Did You Know?

Sea Whip, though it looks like a plant, is actually whole colony of animals.

A piece of sea whip that washes up on the beach at Cape Hatteras National Seashore is not a plant, but the skeleton of a whole colony of animals. A tiny animal lived in each hole on the yellow, orange or purple stems. It had a mouth, a stomach and eight tentacles to catch food.