• Spring-time view of the seashore, with shorebirds returning to the surf.

    Cape Hatteras

    National Seashore North Carolina

Public Comment Reopens on Cape Hatteras ORV Rule

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Date: September 9, 2011
Contact: Outer Banks Group, 252-473-2111

The National Park Service (NPS) announces that a Federal Register Notice has been published today to reopen the public comment period for the proposed rule to manage off-road vehicle use at Cape Hatteras National Seashore in North Carolina. The additional comment period allows more time for those who may have been affected by Hurricane Irene to submit comments.

DATES:Comments must be received before midnight (Eastern Daylight Time) on September 19, 2011.

ADDRESSES:You may submit comments, identified by the Regulation Identifier Number 1024-AD85, by either of the following methods:

·Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments.

·Mail or hand deliver to: Superintendent, Cape Hatteras National Seashore, 1401 National Park Drive, Manteo, North Carolina 27954.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:Mike Murray, Superintendent, Cape Hatteras National Seashore, 1401 National Park Drive, Manteo, North Carolina 27954. Phone: (252) 473-2111 (ext 148).

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:On July 6, 2011, the NPS published in the Federal Register a proposed rule to manage off-road vehicle use at Cape Hatteras National Seashore, North Carolina. (76 FR 39350)The 60-day public comment period for this proposal closed on September 6, 2011.Hurricane Irene made landfall in the area of the Seashore on Saturday August 27, 2001, resulting in wide-spread damage there, and north along the east coast into New England.Because hurricane damage may have prevented some affected persons from commenting on the rule, the NPS is reopening the public comment period through September 19, 2011. We do not anticipate extending the public comment period beyond this date due to a court-imposed deadline for completing the final rule.

If you have already commented on the proposed rule, you do not have to resubmit your comments. This includes comments submitted directly to the NPS by mail or hand delivery between September 6 and September 9, 2011.Note: The Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov did not accept any electronic comments after midnight (Eastern Daylight Time) on September 6, 2011, until the reopening of the comment period as described in today's Federal Register Notice.

New or additional comments submitted through Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov or submitted by mail must be entered or postmarked before midnight (Eastern Daylight Time) September 19, 2011. Comments submitted by hand delivery must be received by the close of business hours (5:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time) on September 19, 2011.

Comments will not be accepted by fax, email, or in any way other than those specified above, and bulk comments in any format (hard copy or electronic) submitted on behalf of others will not be accepted.

All submissions must include the words "National Park Service" or "NPS" and must include the identifying number 1024-AD85.Comments received through the Federal eRulemaking portal athttp://www.regulations.gov will be available on the regulations.gov web site, usually without change.Before including your address, phone number, e-mail address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment -- including your personal identifying information -- may be made publicly available at any time.While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. To view comments received through the Federal eRulemaking portal, go to http://www.regulations.gov and enter 1024-AD85 in the Keyword or ID search box.

Did You Know?

Sea Whip, though it looks like a plant, is actually whole colony of animals.

A piece of sea whip that washes up on the beach at Cape Hatteras National Seashore is not a plant, but the skeleton of a whole colony of animals. A tiny animal lived in each hole on the yellow, orange or purple stems. It had a mouth, a stomach and eight tentacles to catch food.