• Spring-time view of the seashore, with shorebirds returning to the surf.

    Cape Hatteras

    National Seashore North Carolina

NPS Celebrates 10th Anniversary of the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse Move on Friday, October 2nd

Cape Hatteras lighthouse in its new location.

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News Release Date: September 24, 2009
Contact: Cyndy Holda, 252-473-2111, ext. 148

Superintendent Mike Murray invites the general public to a special program on the grounds of the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse Friday, October 2 from 10:30 a.m. to 12:00noon to recognize the 10th anniversary of the move of this extraordinary beacon. The Lighthouse has served as an aid to navigation since 1870.

 

“The Cape Hatteras Lighthouse has served as an aid to navigation since 1870, and also as a symbol of the dedication courage, and the commitment of those people who have and continue to make their livelihood from the sea,” stated Superintendent Mike Murray. “We celebrate the past decade that the Lighthouse has served the public so well and hope that she remains standing tall for future generations to enjoy for many, many years to come.”

 

This past summer marks the 10th anniversary of the “move of the century” when the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse was moved back from the Atlantic Ocean and out of harm’s way. During the summer of 1999 the Lighthouse was moved from its original 1870 location and set down at the current site, 2,900 feet to the southwest and 1,600 feet from the Atlantic Ocean shoreline. The move, which took about 175 days of on-site preparation, was completed in 23 days from June 17 to July 9, 1999, amid a great deal of media coverage and controversy.

 

October 2, 2009 will be a “fee free” day at the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse and the fee to climb will be waived. For more information, call 252-473-2111 ext. 148 or the Buxton Visitor Center at 252-995-4474.

Did You Know?

Ocracoke Inlet was one of the most heavily traveled inlets in the 1700s.

In the 1700s, Ocracoke Inlet was one of the busiest inlets in the East. It was one of the few navigable waterways for ships accessing inland ports such as Elizabeth City, Edenton or New Bern. It was here that Blackbeard the pirate found the inlet's heavy shipping traffic ripe for easy pickings.