• Spring-time view of the seashore, with shorebirds returning to the surf.

    Cape Hatteras

    National Seashore North Carolina

Changes to Visitor Services in Outer Banks Parks

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Date: November 27, 2013
Contact: Outer Banks Group, 252-475-9034

Outer Banks Group Superintendent Barclay Trimble today announced changes to several visitor services made necessary by the parks' current budget.In October, to re-open the government, Congress provided funds at Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 levels through January 15, 2014.Final funding for FY 2014 may not be resolved before then.

"Given our current budget realities and the uncertainty for the future, the National Park Service is exercising extreme caution in spending to ensure that available funding is directed towards the highest priorities," Trimble said.

The following operational changes will occur this fiscal year:

  • Cape Hatteras National Seashore (Seashore) Visitor Centers located on Ocracoke Island and the Fort Raleigh Visitor Center will be closed on Mondays and Tuesdays from December 2, 2013, through mid-March to early April 2014.
  • Lifeguard operations on all three lifeguarded beaches in the Seashore will be discontinued for FY 2014.
  • Eight garbage dumpsters located adjacent to beach access ramps along NC Highway 12 will be replaced with smaller trash/recycling containers.
  • Temporary structures at Wright Brothers National Memorial will be removed, providing substantial savings on utility and maintenance costs.

Other measures include reducing purchases of supplies and equipment, decreasing staff travel and training, and postponing vehicle procurement.There is also a likelihood of delaying the hiring of vacant positions.

"We wish we did not have to reduce our visitor services, and we know a lot of people will be disappointed, but we had to make some difficult decisions regarding park operations and priorities," Trimble said."The current budget situation does not allow us, to have sufficient staff to keep the same number of hours and the degree of services as we have done in the past.We hope the situation changes and we will be able to return our visitor services to their former operating schedules in the future."

Did You Know?

A navigational chart showing Cape Hatteras and Diamond Shoals

When the Home sank on Diamond Shoals off of Cape Hatteras in 1837, there were only two life jackets for all 130 people on board. Ninety people died. Congress passed the Steamboat Act the next year, requiring all vessels to carry one life jacket per passenger.