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Base of Bodie Island Lighthouse to Open for Viewing

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Date: July 27, 2007
Contact: Outer Banks Group, (252) 473-2111

Having recently completed an emergency stabilization project at the Bodie Island Lighthouse, the National Park Service will be opening the base of the structure for public viewing on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. beginning Tuesday, July 31. This schedule will be in effect through Labor Day. The tower itself will not be open for climbing.

Cape Hatteras National Seashore volunteers will be at the lighthouse on these days to greet visitors wishing to view the old oil house and peer up the spiraling cast iron stair case of the 1873 tower. Volunteers will be telling stories of the light station’s past as well as of plans of future restoration projects, including a major repair of the structure anticipated to begin in 2008.

"We are excited to be able to open the base of the Bodie Island Lighthouse," stated Outer Banks Group Superintendent Mike Murray. "The community volunteers staffing the tower will be giving Outer Banks visitors a very special experience." Those interested in joining this volunteer team should contact Park Ranger Marcia Lyons at (252) 995-4474 x21.

The Bodie Island Lighthouse is on the National Register of Historic Places. The base has not been open since 2004 due to safety concerns after pieces of cast iron fell from the lighthouse balcony and top window. The tower is located a short distance south of Nags Head, NC in a quiet and picturesque setting, adjacent to a freshwater pond and the old light keepers’ dwelling that currently serves as a Seashore visitor center. The visitor center is opened daily, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. during summer months.

Did You Know?

Sea Whip, though it looks like a plant, is actually whole colony of animals.

A piece of sea whip that washes up on the beach at Cape Hatteras National Seashore is not a plant, but the skeleton of a whole colony of animals. A tiny animal lived in each hole on the yellow, orange or purple stems. It had a mouth, a stomach and eight tentacles to catch food.