• Ocean waters of Cape Hatteras National Seashore

    Cape Hatteras

    National Seashore North Carolina

There are park alerts in effect.
show Alerts »
  • Off-Road Vehicle Regulations

    Please check here for information on how to get your Off-Road Vehicle (ORV) permit. More »

Light Stations

Guardians of the Sea
Throughout history, the watery perils that exist off North Carolina's coast have endangered mariners as well as any ocean going passengers. Hundreds of ships have fallen prey to formidable currents, fierce storms, and shifting shoals in the infamous "Graveyard of the Atlantic." The construction of lighthouses on the Outer Banks, therefore, was crucial to protect both lives and commerce against the hazards of the sea.

Two tall coastal lights, Bodie Island and Cape Hatteras, were built in the 1870s to warn ships traveling along the Outer Banks of the dangerous shoals along the islands. The Ocracoke Lighthouse, a harbor light at the southern end of the seashore, was completed in 1823 as a light to mark Ocracoke Inlet and Silver Lake.

Today, these three light stations, so called because they have multiple buildings including a lighthouse and a keepers' dwelling, still serve as active aids-to-navigation along the Cape Hatteras National Seashore.

Did You Know?

Seasparkle, a tiny dinoflagellate that can be seen glowing in the surfline at night.

The beaches along Cape Hatteras National Seashore sparkle at night. When you kick the sand, you disturb tiny dinoflagellates like seasparkle, magnified in the picture to the left. A chemical reaction causes them to glow with a blue-green light.