• The Great House at Casa Grande Ruins stands out for miles

    Casa Grande Ruins

    National Monument Arizona

Special Program on Edible Desert Plants

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Date: January 7, 2014
Contact: Karl Cordova, 520 723-3172

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE—January 7, 2014

Karl Cordova, Superintendent  (520) 723-3172

 

Casa Grande Ruins Offers Special Exhibitor

  Native Desert Plants – January 18 & 19, 2014

 

COOLIDGE, AZ Casa Grande Ruins National Monument is featuring author Jean Groen in the visitor center atrium area on Saturday, January 18 and Sunday, January 19. Jean has been known to say "I don't believe that there is a plant growing (that is safe to eat) that can't be made into some kind of delicious jelly." She will be featuring tastes of her various jellies as well as other treats made from desert plants. There will be a selection of jelly, honey, and other processed foods available for purchase as well. "Jean Groen has been a very well received demonstrator and speaker at Casa Grande for many years" stated Superintendent Karl Cordova. "We are pleased that she is returning to the park to educate the staff and public about nature's bounty in the Sonoran Desert." 

 

There is no additional fee for the special presentation, but visitors must enter the visitor center and pay the usual park entrance fees.

 

 

Casa Grande Ruins National Monument protects the multi-story 'Great House' and the ruins of other ancient structures built by the people of the Sonoran Desert over 800 years ago. Established as the nation's first archeological reserve in 1892, the Ruins sparked the beginning of the archeological preservation movement in America. The Monument is open daily from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. except for Thanksgiving and Christmas. Directions and additional information are available on the Monument's website, http://www.nps.gov/cagr, or you may call (520) 723-3172.

 

-- NPS --

Did You Know?

The 'Big House' at Casa Grande National Monument

Casa Grande Ruins National Monument was the first cultural and prehistoric site to be protected by the United States government. It was set aside in 1892 by President Benjamin Harrison.