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    The stairs at Nauset Light Beach in Eastham are closed due to storm damage. Herring Cove North Lot in Provincetown sustained damage resulting in closure of multiple parking spaces. The Nauset Marsh Trail bridge was destroyed in a 2012 storm. More »

Cape Cod National Seashore to Host Evening Program on the Endangered Roseate Tern

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Date: August 13, 2012
Contact: Sue Haley, 508-255-3421 ext. 15

Roseate Terns: Beyond Breeding" at 7 PM on Tuesday, August 28 at Salt Pond Visitor Center.A recent cooperative research project between Mass Audubon and the USGS suggests that most hatch-year roseate terns use the beaches of Cape Cod as a stopover before beginning their first migratory flight to their wintering grounds in South America.Beach areas on Cape Cod are important for the continued survival of this federally listed species.

 This program is part of the annual "Tuesday Evening Series" at Salt Pond Visitor Center in Eastham. Held weekly at 7 PM in July and August in the air-cooled comfort of the visitor center auditorium, programs focus on the diverse natural and cultural resources on the Outer Cape and are suitable for all ages. Programs are free of charge and accessible. The series is sponsored by the Friends of the Cape Cod National Seashore.

IF YOU GO: Salt Pond Visitor Center is located at the intersection of Route 6 and Nauset Road in Eastham, and can be contacted by calling 508-255-3421. The center is open from 9 AM to 5 PM and staff is available to assist with activity planning. Stop by and visit the museum, view a park film, enjoy panoramic views of Salt Pond and Nauset Marsh and shop in the gift store featuring interpretive items such as books, maps, puzzles, and games. For more information about the seashore's programs, visit the park website at www.nps.gov/caco.

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Did You Know?

Typha latifolia (common cattail)

Most of the cattails on Cape Cod are an exotic, invasive species. While Typha latifolia (common cattail) is native, Typha angustifolia (narrowleaf cattail) is a Eurasian plant that is believed to have been brought to North America by the early colonists.