• Long House in Frijoles Canyon

    Bandelier

    National Monument New Mexico

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  • Access by Shuttle Bus Only

    Through October 27, 2014 all access to the most visited part of the park, Frijoles Canyon, will be via a mandatory shuttle bus from the nearby community of White Rock from 9 AM - 3 PM daily. Private cars may drive in before 9 AM or after 3 PM. More »

White Flowers

Sacred Datura

NPS Photo by Sally King

SACRED DATURA (Datura meteloides)
Very common in late summer and early fall along trails, roadsides, and riverbanks. Sometimes called Jimson Weed, all parts of the plant are very toxic.

 
Apache Plume

NPS Photo by Sally King

APACHE PLUME (Fallugia paradoxa)
A low shrub, blooms most heavily in early summer but continues throughout the summer and into fall. Fruits are feathery, plume-like, and give the plant its common name.
 
Antelope's Horn

NPS Photo by Sally King

ANTELOPE'S HORN (Asclepias asperula)
A member of the milkweed family, this plant can be found in Frijoles Canyon and along the Falls Trail. Flowers are greenish-white with pink centers.
 
Banana Yucca

NPS Photo by Sally King

BANANA YUCCA (Yucca baccata)
Thicker- leafed of the two common yucca in the park. Was very useful to the Ancestral Pueblo people. Found throughout lower elevations and the Pinon-Juniper woodland in the park.
 
Poison Milkweed

NPS Photo by Sally King

POISON MILKWEED (Asclepias subverticillata)
Found along roadways and at the Rio Grande where the soil has been disturbed. Blooms mid to late summer.
 
Scorpionweed

NPS Photo by Sally King

SCORPIONWEED (Phacelia heterophylla)
Flower stalks unfold like a scorpion's tail as they begin to bloom. Blooms in mid to late summer. Found on mesas and in canyons throughout the lower elevations of the park.
 
Virgin's Bower

NPS Photo by Sally King

WESTERN VIRGIN'S BOWER (Clematis ligusticifolia)
Found in the damp canyons including Frijoles Canyon. Blooms in mid summer. This vine is a member of the same genus as the clematis you might grow at home.
 
Candytuft

NPS Photo by Sally King

CANDYTUFT (Thlaspi alpestre)
Early spring bloomer. Mostly in moist canyons or higher elevations.
 
Canada Violet

NPS Photo by Sally King

CANADA VIOLET (Viola canadensis)
Blooms in early to mid spring and occasionally again in late summer. Found in moist canyon bottoms.
 
Bricklebush

NPS Photo by Sally King

BRICKLEBUSH (Brickellia spp.)
Blooms mid to late summer in canyons and on canyon slopes.
 
Wild Buckwheat

NPS Photo by Sally King

WILD BUCKWHEAT (Eriogonum leptophyllium)
Low growing bushy plant. Blooms in late spring and early summer.
 
Clammyweed

NPS Photo by Sally King

CLAMMYWEED (Polanisia trachysperma)
Mid to late summer bloomer. Found in disturbed soil like around roads and trails.
 
Yarrow

NPS Photo by Sally King

Yarrow (Achillea lanulosa)
Blooms late summer to early fall. Found in moist canyon bottoms.
 
Doveweed

NPS Photo by Sally King

DOVEWEED (Croton texensis)
Also called Croton. Blooms early to mid summer. Found in disturbed soil like along roadways or trails.
 
Fleabane

NPS Photo by Sally King

FLEABANE (Erigeron spp.)
There are several species of Fleabane, also called daisies, found in the park. They bloom all summer long but are most abundant in the spring. Different species are found in all parts of the park.
 
Black Nightshade

NPS Photo by Sally King

BLACK NIGHTSHADE (Solanum nigrum)
Blooms in late summer. Found along trails and roads in disturbed soils.
 
Chokecherries

NPS Photo by Sally King

CHOKECHERRY (Prunus virginiana)
Small bushy tree. Blooms in late spring. Attracts insects. Found in moist canyons like Frijoles Canyon.
 
Pussytoes

NPS Photo by Sally King

PUSSYTOES (Antennaria parvifolia)
Blooms early to mid summer. Found in meadows or open areas of the Ponderosa pine or mixed Conifer forests.
 
Richardson's Geranium

NPS Photo by Sally King

RICHARDSON'S GERANIUM (Geranium richardsonii)
Blooms in early summer and continues to bloom throughout the summer and into autumn. Found in moist areas of the Ponderosa pine and mixed conifer forests.
 

Did You Know?

Scorpionweed blooms

Scorpionweed gets its name from the shape of the flowers, which unfold like a scorpion's tail as they prepare to bloom.