• Long House in autumn

    Bandelier

    National Monument New Mexico

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  • Access by Shuttle Bus Only

    Through October 27, 2014 all access to the most visited part of the park, Frijoles Canyon, will be via a mandatory shuttle bus from the nearby community of White Rock from 9 AM - 3 PM daily. Private cars may drive in before 9 AM or after 3 PM. More »

Pink or Purple Flowers

Bee Balm

NPS Photo by Sally King

BEE BALM (Monarda menthaefolia)
Also called Horsemint. Common in wet canyon bottoms or at higher elevation. Blooms mid to late summer.
 
Thistle with Monarch

NPS Photo by Sally King

WAVYLEAF THISTLE (Cirsium undulatum)
Common in disturbed areas, like along roadsides or along the Rio Grande. Attracts numerous insects including a variety of butterflies. Blooms early summer into autumn.

 
Variegated Penstemon

NPS Photo by Sally King

VARIEGATED PENSTEMON (Penstemon virgatus)
Light pink to white flowers with deeper pink streaks. Common in the pinon-juniper woodland. Blooms mid to late summer.
 
Chicory

NPS Photo by Sally King

CHICORY (Cichorium intybus)
Most commonly found along roadways. Blooms throughout the summer.
 
four oclock with friend

Photo by Sally King

SHOWY FOUR-O'CLOCK (Mirabilis multiflora)
Blooms mid summer. Beautiful and distinctive flowers that can be seen along the entrance road and the Main Loop Trail. Common in the pinon-juniper woodland.
 
Wild Rose

NPS Photo by Sally King

WILD ROSE (Rosa woodsii)
Blooms in early summer, with flowers followed by a reddish fruit. Common in canyon areas and less common on mesas.
 
Cholla

NPS Photo by Sally King

WALKING STICK CHOLLA (Opuntia imbricata)
Also called Cane Cholla. Blooms in late May, early June. Hot pink flowers are replaced by yellow,green fruit. Very useful plant for the Ancestral Pueblo people.
 
Valerian

NPS Photo by Sally King

VALERIAN (Valeriana capitata)
Blooms in early spring in the moist canyons. Also called Tobacco Root.
 
Desert Four-O'clock

NPS Photo by Sally King

DESERT FOUR-O'CLOCK (Oxybaphus linearis)
Blooms late summer. Same vivid color as Showy Four-O'clock but much smaller flowers. Common in the pinon-juniper woodlands and Ponderosa forests.
 
Beardtongue

NPS Photo by Sally King

BEARDTONGUE (Penstemon secundiflorus)
Blooms in late spring. Common in canyons and the pinon-juniper woodlands.
 
wild iris

NPS Photo by Sally King

WILD IRIS (Iris missouriensis)
Also called Blue Flag. Mid-late spring bloomer. Found in most areas of the mixed conifer and spruce forests or in subalpine forests. Good trails to find them include Alamo Boundary, Cerro Grande, and Ski trails.
 
Mariposa Lily

NPS Photo by Sally King

MARIPOSA LILY (Calochortus gunnisonii)
Blooms in mid to late summer. Found in higher elevation meadows within the park like along Cerro Grande or Alamo Boundary trails.
 
Harebell

NPS Photo by Sally King

HAREBELL (Campanula rotundifolia)
Blooms mid to late summer. Found in the moist canyons like Frijoles Canyon and in subalpine meadows.
 
pincushion 10b

Photo by Sally King

PINCUSHION CACTUS (Coryphantha vivipara)
Blooms in late summer. Low growing cactus covered with long thin spines. Found in the pinon-juniper woodland.
 
hummingbird at Showy Milkweed

NPS Photo by Sally King

SHOWY MILKWEED (Asclepias speiosa)
Blooms in mid to late summer. Common in disturbed soil like along the Rio Grande.
 
Rocky Mnt Beeplant

NPS Photo by Sally King

ROCKY MOUNTAIN BEE-PLANT (Cleome serrulata)
Blooms in mid to late summer. Found in disturbed soils like along roadways, trails.
 
Rocky Mountain Clematis

NPS Photo by Sally King

ROCKY MOUNTAIN CLEMATIS (Clematis pseudoalpina)
Blooms in late spring to early summer. Common in moist canyons and the slopes of the Ponderosa pine and mixed conifer forests such as Upper Frijoles Canyon.
 
Violet Woodsorrel

NPS Photo By Sally King

VIOLET WOODSORREL (Oxalis violacea)
Bloom in mid to late summer. Found in the moist canyons in the park such as Frijoles Canyon.
 
Jacob's Ladder

NPS Photo by Sally King

JACOB'S LADDER (Polemonium foliosissimum)
Blooms in mid to late summer. Found in meadows in the higher elevations of the park like along Cerro Grande trail.
 

Did You Know?

Tarantula Hawk

Tarantula hawk hatchlings feed on the still living body of a tarantula captured by their mother. The mother tarantula hawk must fight the tarantula and then drag it to a burrow where she deposits an egg.