• Double O Arch

    Arches

    National Park Utah

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Dwarf Evening-primrose (Tufted Evening-primrose; White Tufted Evening-primrose; Morning-lily; Handkerchief Plant)

Oenothera caespitosa

Oenothera caespitosa

Family: Onagraceae (Evening-primrose Family)

Perennial herbs from taproots; stems to 2' (6 dm) long

Leaves: leaves in a basal rosette with some leaves possibly alternate along stem; simple; margin entire, toothed, lobed or cleft to the midline; 0.6” to 12” (1.5 to 30 cm) long, 0.2” to 1.6” (0.5 to 4 cm) wide

Flowers: 4 white petals, 4 sepals; 8 stamens; stigma 4 lobed; bisexual; usually radially symmetrical; fragrant; petals 0.8” to 2.4” (2 to 6 cm) long; flowers are usually open in late afternoon or evening; petals fade to pink after pollination

Pollinators: hawkmoths (White-lined sphinx moth - Hyles ), and bees (specifically Lasioglossum, Centris, Xylocopa, Andrena)

Fruits: 4 chambered capsule

Blooms in Arches National Park: March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, early November

Habitat in Arches National Par : desert shrub, grassland and pinyon-juniper communities

Location seen: park road mile 0 to 8

Other: The genus name, “Oenothera”, means “wine-scented” and refers to the use of the roots in winemaking. The species name, “caespitosa”, means “low growing” and refers to the stature of the plant flowers.

Did You Know?

Detail of petroglyph panel

Native Americans never inhabited Arches on a year-round basis, though they certainly roamed the area searching for wild game, useful plants and rocks for tool-making. Petroglyphs near Wolfe Ranch are thought to have been created by Indians from the Ute/Paiute cultures. More...