• Double O Arch

    Arches

    National Park Utah

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  • Delicate Arch Viewpoint Inaccessible

    Wolfe Ranch and the hiking trail to Delicate Arch are open, but flood waters and mud have blocked the road to Delicate Arch Viewpoint.

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Dwarf Evening-primrose (Tufted Evening-primrose; White Tufted Evening-primrose; Morning-lily; Handkerchief Plant)

Oenothera caespitosa

Oenothera caespitosa

Family: Onagraceae (Evening-primrose Family)

Perennial herbs from taproots; stems to 2' (6 dm) long

Leaves: leaves in a basal rosette with some leaves possibly alternate along stem; simple; margin entire, toothed, lobed or cleft to the midline; 0.6” to 12” (1.5 to 30 cm) long, 0.2” to 1.6” (0.5 to 4 cm) wide

Flowers: 4 white petals, 4 sepals; 8 stamens; stigma 4 lobed; bisexual; usually radially symmetrical; fragrant; petals 0.8” to 2.4” (2 to 6 cm) long; flowers are usually open in late afternoon or evening; petals fade to pink after pollination

Pollinators: hawkmoths (White-lined sphinx moth - Hyles ), and bees (specifically Lasioglossum, Centris, Xylocopa, Andrena)

Fruits: 4 chambered capsule

Blooms in Arches National Park: March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, early November

Habitat in Arches National Par : desert shrub, grassland and pinyon-juniper communities

Location seen: park road mile 0 to 8

Other: The genus name, “Oenothera”, means “wine-scented” and refers to the use of the roots in winemaking. The species name, “caespitosa”, means “low growing” and refers to the stature of the plant flowers.

Did You Know?

Landscape Arch

Landscape Arch is the longest arch in Arches National Park, measuring 306 feet from base to base. In 1991, a massive slab of rock fell from its underside, resulting in an even thinner ribbon of rock.