• Double O Arch

    Arches

    National Park Utah

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    Due to extremely dry conditions, fire restrictions are in effect in all national park units in Southeast Utah. More »

Curriculum Materials

These lessons are designed for grades one through six in a desert landscape, but many could be adapted to other grades and other ecosystems. Click here for tips on successfully managing an outdoor classroom.

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Showing results 11-19 of 19

  • Canyonlands National Park

    Water Cycle

    Water Cycle

    Students hear a story and dance to a water cycle music video. While visiting a wetlands ecosystem they act out the process of erosion in different environments, and participate in a relay where they pretend to be agents of evaporation and precipitation. Students imagine they experience the water cycle first hand and write a poem about it. Afterwards, each student creates a regional drawing of the water cycle.

  • Arches National Park

    Living & Non-living Interactions

    Living & Non-living Interactions

    Students examine the interaction of elements of the food chain - producers, consumers and decomposers - through dioramas and art projects in the classroom. In the field, a story and an active game reinforce predator-prey relationships. Students examine decomposers and their vital role in the nutrient cycle, then they investigate energy loss in the high desert food chain.

  • Arches National Park

    Rocks

    Rocks

    Students explore a few rocks and minerals of the area. They investigate how sandstone was formed and experiment with erosion to demonstrate how local landforms are the result of sand and rock being removed. Students explore biological soil crust, and search for clues to discover how we use rocks compared to the people who lived here in ancient times.

  • Arches National Park

    Animal Adaptations

    Animal Adaptations

    Students are introduced to animal adaptations as both activities and anatomy that help animals survive. On the field trip, students explore for beaver sign and dress-up one student to illustrate the amazing adaptations of this animal. Students pretend to be raptors, learning why the birds need sharp eyesight, and play a game that illustrates the adaptations of deer and mountain lions. Finally, they migrate as a gaggle of geese, and examine how much energy it takes to make the long journey.

  • Arches National Park

    Cultural Contributions

    Cultural Contributions

    A pre-trip activity introduces archeology and the artifacts that provide clues to the lives of ancient people. On the field trip, students make their own pottery, cordage, and rock art replicas, and examine an ancient rock art panel. Back in the classroom, students create a timeline of their own lives to learn how vandals can destroy the archeological record.

  • Arches National Park

    Preparing for Winter

    Preparing for Winter

    This in-class presentation uses story and visualization to explore how different types of animals survive the winter.

  • Arches National Park

    Traveling Safely in the Desert

    Traveling Safely in the Desert

    This in-class presentation explores the tools a student needs to hike safely in the desert ecosystem. Students learn their directions, things to bring with them, and what to do if they get lost.

  • Arches National Park

    Imaginary River Trip

    Imaginary River Trip

    Students take an imaginary river trip -- right in their classrooms. Along the way they explore how humans, animals, and insects use the river to survive.

  • Great Sand Dunes National Park & Preserve

    Digging Back in Time

    Students will participate in a virtual dig and use accompanying field notes and action photos to investigate their own online "hearth" site.

Did You Know?

Graffiti-free Zone

Even though graffiti is prohibited by law, rangers and volunteer groups spend hundreds of hours every year removing it in Arches. Please join us in protecting the park by not leaving your mark. If you discover graffiti in the park, please let us know. Otherwise, make memories, take pictures, but leave no visible trace of your visit. More...