• Cannon and Cornfield at Dawn

    Antietam

    National Battlefield Maryland

Tour Stop 6 - Mumma Farm and Cemetery

Mumma Farm House
 

Introduction

The only deliberate destruction of property during the battle was the burning of this farm. Confederate soldiers were or­dered to burn these structures to pre­vent their use by Union sharpshooters. Fortunately, Samuel Mumma and his family had fled to safety before the battle. The Mumma family rebuilt the home in 1863.

 

"...a set of farm buildings in our front were set on fire to prevent them being made use of by the enemy."
Confederate General Roswell S. Ripley

This farmstead and cemetery were part of Samuel and Elizabeth Mumma's property in 1862. Warned of the coming battle, the Mummas and their ten children fled to safety. Fearful that Union sharpshooters would use the farm buildings as a strongpoint, Confederates set fire to them. The column of fire and smoke was visible all morning above the battlefield. This fire was the only deliberate destruction of civilian property. One Union soldier remembered, "Just in front of us a house was burning, and the fire and smoke, flashing of muskets and whizzing of bullets, yells of men …were perfectly horrible."

The Mummas spent the winter at the Sherrick farm near Burnside Bridge and were able to rebuild in 1863. After the war, the Federal Government compensated residents for damage caused by Union soldiers. However, since this farm was burned by Confederates, the Mummas received no compensation. Starting in 1870 the family deeded interest in this burial ground to local families. Neighbors who suffered from war and came together to rebuild their community, now rest together in this peaceful enclosure.

 

Go to the next tour stop - the Union Advance

Did You Know?

The Texas Flag

The First Texas Infantry lost 82% of their men killed, wounded and missing while fighting in the Cornfield at Antietam, the highest casualty rate for any Confederate regiment in one battle of the Civil War.