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    Andersonville

    National Historic Site Georgia

Directions

Andersonville National Historic Site is located in southwest Georgia. The park is approximately 12 miles north of Americus and 11 miles south of Montezuma on GA-49. No public transportation systems serve the park.

GPS and Navigational Devices

To reach the main entrance of the park please use the following address:
760 POW Road
Andersonville, GA 31711

Please note that the Cemetery Gate entrance is to be used only for funerals and is kept closed.

 
Area map showing roads and communities in the vicinity of Andersonville National Historic Site

Driving Directions

From the north, via I-75
Follow I-75 south to Exit 135 (Perry). Head southwest on GA-224 from the interstate to Montezuma, approximately 20 miles. Just outside Montezuma, turn right on GA-26 and follow to the intersection of GA-49. Turn left on GA-49 and head south approximately 6 miles to Andersonville. The park entrance will be on the left.

From the south, via I-75
Follow I-75 north to Exit 101 (Cordele). Head west on US-280 from Cordele to Americus, approximately 30 miles. In Americus, turn right onto GA-49 and head north approximately 10 miles to Andersonville. The park entrance will be on the right, after passing the park exit and cemetery entrance.

From the Columbus area
Follow GA-520/US-280 toward Cusseta. Turn left on GA-26 and head east to Buena Vista, approximately 16 miles. Continue on GA-26 to Ellaville, approximately 15 miles. In Ellaville, turn right onto US-19 then left onto GA-228. Follow GA-228 east to Andersonville, approximately 12 miles. In Andersonville, turn left on GA-49 and head north approximately 1 mile. The park entrance will be on the right.

From the Albany area
Follow US-19 north toward Americus, approximately 36 miles. In Americus, turn right onto US-280 and continue east through downtown Americus to Tripp Street. Turn left on Tripp Street/GA-49 and head north approximately 10 miles to Andersonville. The park entrance will be on the right, after passing the park exit and cemetery entrance.

Did You Know?

The HMS Jersey in 1782

Around 30,000 Americans were kept as prisoners of war in and around New York City during the Revolutionary War. Most of these prisoners were held in warehouses, churches, and on ships in nearby harbors. An estimated 18,000 (60%) died as prisoners from 1775 to 1783. Of those, over 10,000 are thought to have perished on prison ships, most notably the Whitby and the Jersey.