• North HillSide Photomerge

    Andersonville

    National Historic Site Georgia

Field Trips

Park staff have developed a series of activities and on-site programs designed to help students understand the experiences of Union Prisoners of war held at the Camp Sumter military prison during the American Civil War. These activities include both ranger-led and teacher-led activities.

Please read our 2013-2014 Field Trip Planner for more information on planning a field trip to Andersonville.

Guided field trips are offered by Andersonville staff weekly most Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays during the school year. Use the search utility below to locate available programs, and email us with your questions. Please note that field trip confirmation may take up to seven days.

Presently, schools have two options for field-trip programs at Andersonville:

  • Ranger-Led Programs: Grades K-12
    The park offers two ranger-led programs for school groups. Ranger programs are forty-five minutes in length and can accomodate up to 55 students. "Relics of Civilization" is for younger students up to the fifth grade as well as mixed-grade homeschool and distance-learning groups. "Life and Death in a Rebel Prison" is designed for the sixth through twelth grade.
  • Self-guiding Field Trips; Grades K - 12

    School groups are welcome to visit Andersonville self-guided. The park offers a wide variety of resources to assist teachers in organizing their visit. Self-guided groups must schedule with park staff to avoid "double-bookings."

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Did You Know?

Bronze panel showing a prison scene on the back of a stone monument

Most visitors exploring Andersonville National Cemetery are unaware that the New York monument has an image sculpted on the reverse side of the memorial. The image on the reverse depicts two Andersonville prisoners. One is seen as dejected while the other appears hopeful. An angel approaches the prisoners carrying an olive branch, the symbol of peace, which was used to represent the reconciliation between the North and the South. More...