• Views from Penobscot Mountain summit.

    Acadia

    National Park Maine

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  • Temporary Road Closure

    A section of the Western Mtn Road in Southwest Harbor will be closed until 8/18 while park crews replace a culvert with a new fish-friendly open bottom culvert. For more information and a map visit our Getting Around Page. More »

  • Trail Closure: Gorge Path weekdays, 7 am - 4 pm

    The section of the Gorge Path between the Hemlock Path intersection and the A. Murray Young Trail intersection is closed until rehabilitation work is completed. The closure will be in effect Mondays through Fridays only, from 7 am to 4 pm.

Tidepooling

Tidepool VIP
The longer you watch, the more you'll see.
NPS
 
wading

Where

 

Self Guided:

  • Bar Island Sand Bar: Great for young children. Accessible off Bridge street for about 1.5 hours on either side of low tide.
  • Ship Harbor and Wonderland: West side of Mount Desert Island

Ranger Programs: Check the Schedule of Events for times.

  • Life Between the Tides: June, September, October at Ship Harbor
  • Beyond the Beach: July and August at Sand Beach
 

When

 

Before you head out to the intertidal zone on your own, check online for a tide chart. The best times for tidepooling are the extreme low tides of the full and new moons ("spring" tides).

 

Tips and Safety

 
Remember these marine animals are not indestructible. Our careless handling and footsteps can do damage that the changing tides cannot. When you visit the intertidal zone, keep in mind these tips for your safety and for the protection of marine life:
  • Do not wade or sit in tidepools.
  • Rocks and algae are slippery. Watch your step.
  • Never turn your back on the ocean: rogue waves can occur at any time.
  • Wear suitable clothing and closed-toe shoes.
  • Sea creatures live everywhere. Be careful where you place your feet.
  • If you move animals or rocks, return them to the same spot.
  • Do not pry animals from rocks; you may injure them in the process.
  • Re-cover animals you find under rocks or seaweed so they won't dry out.
  • All living creatures are protected in the park. Take only pictures.

Did You Know?

A girl stands along the stone steps of the Kurt Diederich Path in this historic image taken around 1920.

Acadia National Park contains more than 120 miles of historic hiking trails. Many of these trails were established by local village improvement societies in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Today many of the historic features, such as stonework, are still visible.