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    The section of the Gorge Path between the Hemlock Path intersection and the A. Murray Young Trail intersection is closed until rehabilitation work is completed. The closure will be in effect Mondays through Fridays only, from 7 am to 4 pm.

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    Bubble Pond Carriage Road will be closed to all traffic Monday 9/15- Wednesday 9/17 from the parking lot to Triad-Day Mountain Bridge. More »

Open House at Brown Mountain Gate Lodge

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Date: March 11, 2011

Open House at Brown Mountain Gate Lodge

March 26, 2011

Bar Harbor, ME - Acadia National Park will hold an open house at the Brown Mountain Gate Lodge on Saturday, March 26, 2011, from 9 a.m. to noon. Visitors will get a chance to explore the inside of the gate lodge and to view a stone cutting demonstration by Steve Haynes, of the Maine Granite Museum, which will take place at 10 a.m. After the demonstration, take a walk around the outside of the building to learn about the style and construction process.

The Brown Mountain Gate Lodge was financed by John D. Rockefeller Jr. and designed by Grosvenor Atterbury, a prominent New York architect, in the French Romanesque style, which greatly pleased George Dorr, the first superintendent of Acadia National Park, because of the island's early connections with France. It was completed in 1933 with the intention of marking the entrance to the carriage roads and preventing automobiles from entering.

Come and experience some of the early history of the park and carriage roads, with a special look at one of Acadia's historic buildings. To reach the Brown Mountain Gate Lodge, follow Route 3 and 198 south from the light in Somesville or north from Northeast Harbor. Please park in the Brown Mt. parking lot on the north side of the gate lodge. For more information, call 207-288-8804.

Did You Know?

A man boards the Island Explorer bus.

Since 1999, propane-powered Island Explorer buses have carried more than two million passengers in Acadia National Park, eliminating more than 685,000 automobile trips and preventing 6,444 tons of greenhouse gases. The fare-free buses are supported by your entrance fees. More...