• Views from Penobscot Mountain summit.

    Acadia

    National Park Maine

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  • Trail Closures: Peregrine Falcon Nesting

    Precipice Cliff, Valley Cove, and Jordan Cliff areas are closed to all public entry until further notice for peregrine falcon nesting season. More »

  • Cultural Connections programs rescheduled for 7/16/2014 due to weather

    Ash Log Pounding demo will take place today 11 am-3 pm at the Abbe Museum downtown (26 Mount Desert St, Bar Harbor). The Burnurwurbskek Singers have been rescheduled to perform on Cadillac Summit next Wed, July 23 at 11 am.

  • Trail Closure: Gorge Path weekdays, 7 am - 4 pm

    The section of the Gorge Path between the Hemlock Path intersection and the A. Murray Young Trail intersection is closed until rehabilitation work is completed. The closure will be in effect Mondays through Fridays only, from 7 am to 4 pm.

Carriage roads to close temporarily

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Date: March 9, 2012

 

Bar Harbor, ME - The carriage road system in Acadia National Park will be closed to all users until the roads thaw sufficiently to allow use without causing damage. The closure began on March 9, 2012, and is expected to last at least two weeks. Spring thawing causes the carriage roads to become soft. Walking, bicycling, or riding horses on them under these conditions can cause significant damage that is costly to repair. If you find a road posted, please respect the request to wait for drier conditions. If a road is not posted where you enter it, but seems so soft that you are sinking in and leaving tracks, don't go on it. Help protect these historic roads, and wait until they dry out.

To check on current conditions, call Acadia National Park at 288-3338 and press "0," or go to Acadia's website at www.nps.gov/acad.

Did You Know?

A girl stands along the stone steps of the Kurt Diederich Path in this historic image taken around 1920.

Acadia National Park contains more than 120 miles of historic hiking trails. Many of these trails were established by local village improvement societies in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Today many of the historic features, such as stonework, are still visible.