THING TO DO

Stand in Abraham Lincoln's Place

Color image of a bronze plaque indicating where he stood while raising the flag in 1861.
Find the plaque located in front of Independence Hall, east of the George Washington statue.

NPS photo

Ponder what the birthplace of a nation meant to a man facing a divided country.
When president-elect Abraham Lincoln stepped into Independence Hall in 1861, he found a shrine to the founding of the nation, proudly displaying the Liberty Bell and original paintings of the Founding Fathers. Standing in the Assembly Room, he said that he would rather be "assassinated on the spot" than give up the ideals of the Declaration of Independence. That day, he also raised the flag in front of Independence Hall. Today, a plaque located on the east side of the statue of George Washington marks the spot. Please note that tickets are required to go inside Independence Hall, but visitors do not need tickets to see the plaque outside.
Details
Pets are not allowed, unless designated assistive animals. 
Entrance fees may apply, see Fees & Passes information.
Independence Hall is located on Chestnut Street, between 5th and 6th Streets. Entrance is through a security screening area on Chestnut Street, just west of 5th Street. Please note that tickets are required to go inside Independence Hall, but visitors do not need tickets to see the plaque outside.

This plaque is located on the east side of the statue of George Washington, in front of Independence Hall along Chestnut Street, in between 5th and 6th Streets.

Check the Operating Hours web page for updated information. 

Accessibility Information
The East Wing orientation room and the first floor of Independence Hall are accessible for those with mobility impairments.

Last updated: June 29, 2018