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Discover the historic places of some of Charleston’s most memorable women and men. Learn more about the Heyward-Washington House, home of the Grimke sisters and the Florence Crittenton Home for young mothers.

Front of Heyward-Washington house, made of bricks. Picture by Ymblanter, CC BY-SA 4.0.

Heyward-Washington House

Constructed in the early 1770s, the Heyward-Washington House was the home of Thomas Heyward Jr, a signer of the Declaration of Independence.

Front of the Florence Crittenton Home in Charleston, CC0.

Florence Crtittenton Home

Built between 1924 and 1932, the Florence Crittenton Home in Charleston was part of the larger National Florence Crittenton Mission.

Photo of Jackson Street Freedman’s Cottages

Jackson Street Freedman’s Cottages

These structures were built in the 1890s to meet the city’s increasing demand for housing.

William Enston Home, Entrance Gate

William Enston Home

A late-19th century example of a planned community for the elderly, the William Enston Home is composted of 24 residential cottages.

Black and white photo of artillery shed turned church.

Porter Military Academy

In 1825, the Federal government acquired land for a new US Arsenal which was later used as an academy to educate former soldiers and boys.

Picture of modern day Coming Street Cemetery.

Coming Street Cemetery

The Coming Street Cemetery, established in 1762, is the oldest Jewish burial ground in the South.

Photograph of Central Baptist Church on a cloudy day.

Central Baptist Church

Central Baptist Church is thought to be one of the first black churches founded and built solely by African Americans in Charleston.

Photograph of Avery Institute.

Avery Institute

Constructed in 1867 to 1868, the Avery Normal Institute was Charleston's first free secondary school for African Americans.

Black and white photo of church.

Old Bethel United Methodist Church

Old Bethel United Methodist Church is the third oldest church building surviving in Charleston.

Black and white photo of a church with Greco-Roman columns.

Bethel Methodist Church

The first Methodist congregation in Charleston purchased this parcel of land in 1795.

Photo of Communications Building, College of Charleston.

College of Charleston

Founded in 1770, the College of Charleston is the oldest municipal college in the United States, and a National Historic Landmark.

Black and white photo of St. Matthew's, circa 1930s.

St. Matthew's German Lutheran Church

Patterned after typical German Gothic churches, St. Matthew's German Lutheran Church is a Gothic Revival church constructed in 1867.

Photo of Marion Square

Marion Square

Formerly known as the Citadel Green, Marion Square is a 10 acre rectangular plot of land that was conveyed to the colony of South Carolina.

Photo ofSouth Carolina State Arsenal

South Carolina State Arsenal

The South Carolina State Arsenal, also known as the Old Citadel, is best known for its association with the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Photo of Emanuel A.M.E. Church

Emanuel A.M.E. Church

The Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church, built in 1891, still retains its original altar, communion rail, pews, and more.

Black and white photo of Beth Elohim Synagogue, circa 1930s.

Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim Synagogue

Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim Synagogue, a National Historic Landmark, is the country's second oldest synagogue and the oldest in continuous use.

Contemporary photo of St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church

St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church

The congregation of St. Mary's was the first Roman Catholic Church in the Carolinas and Georgia.

Contemporary photo of Charleston's Market Hall

Market Hall and Sheds

Market Hall is the only surviving market structure in Charleston, and one of only a few market complexes still extant in the US.

Postcard of United States Custom House

United States Custom House

Majestically overlooking East Bay Street and the harbor, the United States Custom House is one of the most striking buildings in Charleston.

Photo of Powder Magazine

Powder Magazine

A National Historic Landmark, the Powder Magazine is the oldest public building in South Carolina, and reflects Charleston's early history.

Photo of  Circular Congregational Church and Parish House

Circular Congregational Church

The Circular Congregational Church is one of the few examples in Charleston of the adaptation of the Romanesque style.

Historic photo of St. John’s Lutheran Church

St. John’s Lutheran Church

Built from 1816 to 1818, St. John's Lutheran Church houses Charleston's oldest Lutheran congregation.

Photo of Unitarian Church

Unitarian Church

The Unitarian Church, a National Historic Landmark, is the oldest Unitarian church in the South.

Photo of Old Jail

Old Jail

The Old Jail building served as the Charleston County Jail from its construction in 1802 until 1939.

Photo of  Dock Street Theatre

Dock Street Theatre

The Dock Street Theatre is Charleston's last surviving hotel from the antebellum period.

Historic photo of St. Michael’s Episcopal Church

St. Michael’s Episcopal Church

St. Michael's Episcopal Church is one of the finest Colonial American churches in the country and the oldest church in Charleston.

Photo of French Huguenot Church

French Huguenot Church

Completed in 1845, the French Huguenot Church is the third church to be constructed on this site.

Photo of Fireproof Building.

Fireproof Building

The Fireproof Building was the most fire protected building at the time of its construction in 1827.

Photo of the font of Hibernian Hall

Hibernian Hall

Hibernian Hall was built in 1840 to provide a meeting place for the Hibernian Society, an Irish benevolent organization founded in 1801.

Black and white photo of Charleston County Courthouse.

Charleston County Courthouse

The Charleston County Courthouse was first built in 1753 as the provincial capitol for the colony of South Carolina.

Black and white photo of Charleston City Hall, circa 1890-1901.

Charleston City Hall

Charleston City Hall was constructed between 1800 and 1804 in the Adamesque style.

Black and white photo of Charleston United States Post Office, circa

Charleston United States Post Office

The United States Post Office and Courthouse was built in 1896 and designed by local architect John Henry Deveraux.

Photo of South Carolina Society Hall

South Carolina Society Hall

The South Carolina Society Hall is considered one of Charleston's most valuable Adamesque buildings.

Photo of Farmers and Exchange Bank

Farmers and Exchange Bank

The Farmers and Exchange Bank, designed by Edward D. Jones and Francis D. Lee, was built in 1854.

Photo of Exchange and Provost Building

Exchange and Provost Building

Many significant events of the American Revolution and early Federal period occurred at the Exchange and Provost Building.

Photo of First Baptist Church

First Baptist Church

First Baptist Church, often referred to as the "Mother Church of Southern Baptists," is the oldest Baptist Church in the South.

Photo of First Scots Presbyterian

First Scots Presbyterian

First Scots Presbyterian Church, the fifth oldest church in Charleston, was constructed in 1814.

Photo of Citizens and Southern National Bank of South Carolina

Citizens & Southern National Bank of SC

The Citizens and Southern National Bank of South Carolina is the second oldest building constructed as a bank in the United States.

Photo of South Carolina Bank of Charleston

South Carolina Bank of Charleston

The South Carolina Bank of Charleston building has been in continuous use as a bank since it was constructed in 1817.

Historic photo of the Old Marine Hospital

Old Marine Hospital

The Old Marine Hospital was designed by Robert Mills, who was often referred to as the first professionally trained American architect.

Historic photo of Charleston Library Society

Charleston Library Society

Organized in 1748, the Charleston Library Society is thought to be the third library established in the United States.

Historic photo of St. Philip’s Episcopal Church

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church

St. Philip's Episcopal Church houses the oldest congregation in South Carolina.

Last updated: September 18, 2018

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