Cultural Transfer of Knowledge

How Native American food is tied to important sacred stories
By: Rosalyn R. LaPier
The Conversation
June 15, 2018
Keywords: Sacred, food, foodways, stories, transfer, connection, ancestors, religion, plants
https://theconversation.com/how-native-american-food-is-tied-to-important-sacred-stories-97770
Plant foods like maiz for the Mayas, salmon for Northwest Coast tribes, and prairie turnips for the Blackfeet are considered sacred. Young people have renewed interest in learning about collecting and cooking indigenous foods, which is meaningful for cultural transmission, natural conservation, and religious observation.

Implementing Indigenous Knowledge in Western Science Education Systems and Scientific Research on Alaska's North Slope
By: Linda Nicholas-Figueroa, Daniel Wall, Mary van Muelken and Lawrence Duffy
International Journal of Education, Vol. 9, No. 4
2017
Key words: Indigenous knowledge, place-based, STEM, environment, culture, Elders, community
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/321099383
This article discusses how Indigenous knowledge and teaching methods can be combined with western knowledge and teaching methods to improve students' learning and understanding.

Ethnobotanical Knowledge Acquisition during Daily Chores: The Firewood Collection of Pastoral Maasai Girls in Southern Kenya
By: Xiaojie Tian
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 13:2
2017
Key words: Traditional Ecological Knowledge, Pastoral Maasai, Children, Daily Practice, Adaptive Knowledge Acquisition
https://ethnobiomed.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13002-016-0131-x
Researchers considering children’s traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) highlighted the importance of examining children’s daily activities as empirical contexts for its acquisition. Many of them evaluated children’s TEK acquisition linearly as gain or loss, and paid less attention to the adaptive nature of this knowledge system and the social relationships arising from its acquisition processes. This study approaches children’s TEK acquisition considering these abovementioned aspects.

A Comparison of Traditional Plant Knowledge between Students and Herders in Northern Kenya
By: Brett L. Bruyere, Jonathan Trimarco, & Saruni Lemunes
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 12:48
2016
Key words: Samburu, Kenya, Local knowledge, Traditional ecological knowledge, Moran
https://ethnobiomed.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13002-016-0121-z
The Samburu region of northern Kenya is undergoing significant change, driven by factors including greater value on formal education, improvements in infrastructure and development, a shift from community to private ownership of land, increased sedentary lifestyles and global climate change. One outcome of these changes are an increasingly greater likelihood for adolescent boys to be enrolled in school rather than herding livestock on behalf of the family in a landscape shared with numerous native vegetation and wildlife species. This study compared identification and knowledge of native plant species between boys enrolled in school with boys of similar age but primary responsibility as herders, called moran.

Children’s Traditional Ecological Knowledge of Wild Food Resources: A Case Study in a Rural Village in Northeast Thailand
By: Chantita Setalaphruk & Lisa Leimar Price
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 3:33
2007
Key words: Traditional Ecological Knowledge, Wild Food Resources, Thailand
https://ethnobiomed.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1746-4269-3-33
Consuming wild foods is part of the food ways of people in many societies, including farming populations throughout the world. Knowledge of non-domesticated food resources is part of traditional and tacit ecological knowledge, and is largely transmitted through socialization within cultural and household contexts. The context of this study, a small village in Northeast Thailand, is one where the community has experienced changes due to the migration of the parental generation, with the children being left behind in the village to be raised by their grandparents.

Indigenous Environmental Education for Cultural Survival
By: Leanne Simpson, Trent University, Canada
Canadian Journal of Environmental Education, 7(1)
Spring 2002
Keywords: Environmental Education; Program Development; Indigenous Students, Indigenous Education
http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.466.4855&rep=rep1&type=pdf
This paper advocates use of traditional teaching methods of traditional knowledge and western science to address environmental ills. It looks specifically at what makes up successful indigenous knowledge education problems based on the author’s experience as an indigenous person leading these programs in a variety of settings.

Last updated: November 8, 2018