The NPS Secondary Mark

NPS Secondary Mark and NPF Mark -- permission required

In 2014, as the parks community began to organize for the National Park Service Centennial, a new NPS Secondary Mark--sometimes referred to as a licensed logo or partnership logo--was introduced alongside a new mark for the National Park Foundation, the congressionally chartered national charity of the NPS.

Inspired by the National Park Service’s iconic Arrowhead logo, the addition of the Secondary Mark to the NPS brand family offers expanded options to recognize partners and identify efforts associated with the NPS mission, while protecting the NPS Arrowhead. The Arrowhead continues to serve as the official insignia of the National Park Service on uniforms, in our in-park graphic identity program, and other uses. (Learn more about the History of the NPS Visual Identity.)

Retail Licensing of the NPS Secondary Mark

Soon after the introduction of the new marks in 2014, we introduced the Centennial and Find Your Park marks and launched an associated retail-licensing program. While new use of the Centennial Mark officially ended on December 31, 2016, it contributed enormously to the success of the celebration. Licensing the Centennial Mark generated awareness and financial support and it enabled the public to take away Centennial-branded keepsakes.

Building on the lessons learned, we are expanding the use of the NPS Secondary Mark in 2018. It has already appeared in Find Your Park banners, posters, and other materials in parks. It has also been used in some digital media.

In early 2018, the Secondary Mark became available to the in-park partner retail community through the ongoing retail-licensing program managed by the National Park Foundation. This is an exciting way for park partner retailers to provide NPS branded items to their customers and show their support for national parks and NPS programs. In addition, the Secondary Mark began appearing on a small line of t-shirts in mid-April. Using lessons learned from this initial effort, other products will appear later in the year.

Use of the Secondary Mark by Parks, NPS Programs, and Partners

In late 2018, formal guidance about NPS and expanded partner use of the Secondary Mark will be available, ensuring that the mark is protected and used correctly. These formal guidelines will look very similar to the guidelines for the use of the NPS Centennial Mark. The guidance will provide graphic standards, information about how to use the mark in relation to others such as Find Your Park and partner graphics, and guidelines for NPS and partner use in communications, public relations, and other non-commercial materials.

Questions and Answers about the NPS Secondary Mark

No. The classic arrowhead continues to be used as the official insignia on official uniforms, wayside signs, publications, and other materials to identify them with the National Park Service.
Use of the Secondary Mark is more flexible than the arrowhead, which is limited to use solely by the National Park Service. It allows for the greater identification and recognition of official NPS partners, especially in joint initiatives, and it enables retailers to offer products to support the NPS mission. It also provides the public with a way to have NPS-branded mementos of their visit and demonstrate their proud support for national parks and NPS programs.

The Secondary Mark will be carefully licensed to ensure that its use is consistent with NPS values. As the official national charity of the NPS, the National Park Foundation is the authorized manager of the licensing program for the Secondary Mark and works closely with the NPS in the development and implementation of usage guidelines.

In early 2018, it will be available to the in-park partner retail community through the ongoing retail-licensing program managed by the National Park Foundation and on a limited line of t-shirts beginning between late February and late March of 2018. Using lessons learned from this initial effort, other products will appear later in the year.

Later in 2018, guidance will be available for use of the Secondary Mark by parks, NPS programs, and other NPS partners.

A Note About the Centennial and Find Your Park Marks

Centennial Mark -- permission required

The Centennial Mark

In 2014, the NPS Centennial Mark was launched as a visual symbol of the coming celebration. It branded special activities, built recognition of the anniversary, offered flexible use by partners participating in the centennial, and enabled the public to show its support through a licensing program managed by the National Park Foundation. The Centennial Mark was used only through the end of 2016.

Find Your Park logo -- permission required

The Find Your Park Mark

During the centennial, Find Your Park / Encuentra Tu Parque developed a strong following and brand awareness--another successful outcome of the celebration. The Find Your Park / Encuentra Tu Parque invitation continues beyond the centennial and the logo is an integral part of that. While it is not an immediate member of the NPS brand family, it is a close cousin, and the graphic standards for its use have not changed since it was launched in 2015. Parks, NPS programs, and official partners can use Find Your Park in their communications efforts as long as they follow the graphic standards. Commercial use is licensed through the National Park Foundation.

For more information about NPS and partner use of the NPS marks, please email the NPS Partnerships Office. For information about licensing the Secondary Mark or the Find Your Park logo, please contact the National Park Foundation.

For more information about NPS and partner use of the NPS marks, please email the NPS Partnerships Office.

For information about licensing the Secondary Mark or the Find Your Park logo, please contact the National Park Foundation.

Last updated: July 6, 2018