Acknowledgements and References

History of Paleontology in the National Park Service—Santucci, V. L. (page 9 of 9)

students with fossil bison skull

Author, Vince Santucci, enjoying a National Fossil Day celebration with students on the National Mall, Washington D.C.. The history of paleontology and the fossils of the National Park System are part of a legacy that we will pass on to future genrations. Thank you to all who help us to understand and protect our fossil heritage.
NPS photo.


Note: Much of the content of this website is based on an article originally published in Earth Science History and available for downloading and printing through the NPS Integrated Resource Management Applications (IRMA) Portal:

Website Development by Jim Wood.

Acknowledgements

The research and compilation of historical information related to such an extensive topic as the paleontology of the national parks could not be accomplished without the support and guidance of many individuals.

Thanks to the many National Park Service paleontologists, geologists and other staff including: James Hill (AGFO), Rachel Benton (BADL), Don Corrick (BIBE), Alison Mims (BLCA and CURE), Dan Chure (DINO), Herb Meyer (FLFO), Arvid Aase (FOBU), Fred MacVaugh (FOUS), David Lassman, Amy Muraca and Rijk Morawe (GEWA), Gorden Bell (GRBA retired), Ben Tobin, Ed Schenk, Colleen Hyde and Kim Besom (GRCA), Nancy Russell (HFC), Judy Geniac, Greg McDonald and Kari Prassack (HAFO), Patrick Malone and Don Weeks (NPS Intermountain Region), Karie Diethorn (INDE), Ted Fremd and Nick Famoso (JODA), Erin Eichenberg (LAKE), Mike Antonioni (NACE), Heather Eggleston (NNL Program), Bill Parker, Adam Marsh and Matthew Brown (PEFO), Ben Rizner (WUPA) and Jeff Ohlfs (NPS retired). Additional thanks is extended to Erica Clites, Rebecca Hunt-Foster, Robyn Henderek, Cassie Knight, Emily Thorpe, Christy Visaggi and over eighty paleontology interns who have helped uncover the fossil record for the National Park Service.

Several National Park Service historians have recognized the importance of preserving our agency’s history of geology and paleontology, in particular Harry Butowsky, Aubrey Haines (deceased) and Dick Sellars to whom I extend my appreciation. A number of geologists and paleontologists with the U.S. Geological Survey, academia and industry have graciously shared information regarding the history of paleontology in the national parks including: George Billingsley, Robert Blodgett, Bill Cobban, Jack Epstein, Wally Hansen, Jeff Pigati, David Soller, Kathleen Springer, Nancy Stamm, Rob Weems (USGS), Sid Ash (Weber State University), Emmett Evanoff (University of Northern Colorado), Vance Haynes (University of Arizona), John Ostrom (Yale University), Dave Parris (NJ State Museum), Eric Scott (California State University), Morris Skinner (American Museum of Natural History), Earle Spamer (American Philosophical Society), and Don Curry (Shell Oil).

I recognize the continued support from the staff of the National Park Service Geologic Resources Division, especially Dave Steensen, Harold Pranger, Lisa Norby, Jason Kenworthy, Jim Wood, Steve Simon, Julia Brunner, Tim Connors, Bob Higgins (retired), Lindsay McClelland (retired) and Jim Woods (retired). Thanks to Gary Cummins (National Park Service retired), Dave McGinnis (National Park Service retired), Michael Barthelmes (GRD), Bethany DeGraeve, Bianca Santucci and Brianna Santucci for review of the manuscript. A special thanks to paleontologist Justin Tweet and geologist Jason Kenworthy, who have both dedicated themselves to help compile and preserve the fossil record from the National Park Service.

Finally, I would like to thank John Diemer (Editor of Earth Sciences History) and Kathleen Lohff (History of Earth Science Society) for supporting the opportunity to publish a special issue of the journal of Earth Sciences History which focuses on the history of geology in the National Park Service.

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