Japanese American Memorial to Patriotism During World War II

National Mall and Memorial Parks

Bronze sculpture of a crane with barbed wire in its bill.
Cranes entangled in barbed wire symbolize the body and spirit of Japanese Americans during the war.

NPS

Quick Facts

Location:
Louisiana Ave. NW & D St. NW, Washington, D.C.
Significance:
Memorial
Designation:
National Memorial
OPEN TO PUBLIC:
Yes

The Japanese American Memorial to Patriotism During World War II reflects on the legacy of Japense internment camps in the United States during World War II. Many Japanese Americans were treated with suspicion and as potential spies, and were sent to internment camps, in many cases for several years, to sit out the war because of their race, not because of any actual espionage.  As a result, many were displaced and were never able to return home when the war ended.

The memorial's central sculpture evokes a powerful image. Japanese cranes, symbolizing the body and spirit of Japanese Americans, are entangled in barbed wire. The powerful symbolism and subject matter make this memorial unique and unforgettable.

Last updated: October 18, 2018